lsalisbu


Laura Salisbury

Photo of Laura Salisbury

Department of Economics

Assistant Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1092
Phone: (416)736-2100 Ext: 77051
Email: lsalisbu@yorku.ca
Primary website: http://sites.google.com/site/laurahsalisbury
Attached CV: http://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/files/CV_SalisburyLaura.pdf


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. My research interests include economic history, labour economics, and applied microeconomics. More specifically, my research focuses on historical marriage markets, income mobility, and the characteristics and consequences of historical income support programs. I received my Ph.D. from Boston University in 2013.

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Degrees

PhD, Boston University

Appointments

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Research Interests

, Economic History, Labour Economics

Current Research Projects

Long Run Trends in Assortative Mating and Socioeconomic Mobility in the United States and Canada

    Summary:

    We provide new evidence about long-run trends in the transmission of economic status across generations for both men and women. Most historical studies of intergenerational mobility rely on linking individuals across multiple census records using surnames, and married women have historically changed their surnames upon marriage. As such, it is difficult for most such studies to say anything about mobility among women. In the proposed work, we circumvent this problem using a methodology that relies on the socioeconomic content of first names. We measure trends in assortative mating and in the geography of intergenerational mobility within North America. This work will focus on the role of institutions in shaping long-run mobility trends, emphasizing on the complex interrelationship between intergenerational mobility and marriage institutions. By sorting individuals into families, marriage plays a critical role in the transmission of human capital and wealth across generations.

    Description:

    .

    See more
    Role: Applicant

    Start Date:
      Month: Jul   Year: 2016

    End Date:
      Month: Jul   Year: 2018

    Collaborator: Claudia Olivetti and M. Daniele Paserman
    Collaborator Institution: Boston College and Boston University
    Collaborator Role: Co-applicants

    Funders:
    SSHRC Insight Development Grant
Journal Articles

Publication
Year

"Three-Generation Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940: The Role of Paternal and Maternal Grandparents" (with Claudia Olivetti and Daniele Paserman), Explorations in Economic History, Forthcoming.
[go to paper]

2018

"Ideology and Migration after the American Civil War" (with Shari Eli and Allison Shertzer), Journal of Economic History, Forthcoming.
[go to working paper]

2018

"Local Information, Income Segregation, and Geographic Mobility" (with Timothy N. Bond) The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy, Forthcoming.
[go to paper]

2018

"Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," Journal of Economic History 77, no. 1 (2017), pp 1-38.
[go to paper]

2017

"Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South" (with Shari Eli), Journal of Economic History 76, no. 4 (2016), pp 1078-1112.
[go to paper]

2016

"Selective Migration, Wages, and Occupational Mobility in Nineteenth Century America," Explorations in Economic History, 53 (2014), pp 40-63.
[go to paper]

2014


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2018 AP/ECON3259 3.0 A Labour Economics: Institutions(Writing) LECT
Fall 2018 AP/ECON3210 3.0 B Use of Economic Data LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2019 AP/ECON4659 3.0 M North American Economic History LECT
Winter 2019 AP/ECON3210 3.0 M Use of Economic Data LECT


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. My research interests include economic history, labour economics, and applied microeconomics. More specifically, my research focuses on historical marriage markets, income mobility, and the characteristics and consequences of historical income support programs. I received my Ph.D. from Boston University in 2013.

Degrees

PhD, Boston University

Appointments

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Research Interests

, Economic History, Labour Economics

Current Research Projects

Long Run Trends in Assortative Mating and Socioeconomic Mobility in the United States and Canada

    Summary:

    We provide new evidence about long-run trends in the transmission of economic status across generations for both men and women. Most historical studies of intergenerational mobility rely on linking individuals across multiple census records using surnames, and married women have historically changed their surnames upon marriage. As such, it is difficult for most such studies to say anything about mobility among women. In the proposed work, we circumvent this problem using a methodology that relies on the socioeconomic content of first names. We measure trends in assortative mating and in the geography of intergenerational mobility within North America. This work will focus on the role of institutions in shaping long-run mobility trends, emphasizing on the complex interrelationship between intergenerational mobility and marriage institutions. By sorting individuals into families, marriage plays a critical role in the transmission of human capital and wealth across generations.

    Description:

    .

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Applicant

    Start Date:
      Month: Jul   Year: 2016

    End Date:
      Month: Jul   Year: 2018

    Collaborator: Claudia Olivetti and M. Daniele Paserman
    Collaborator Institution: Boston College and Boston University
    Collaborator Role: Co-applicants

    Funders:
    SSHRC Insight Development Grant

All Publications


Journal Articles

Publication
Year

"Three-Generation Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940: The Role of Paternal and Maternal Grandparents" (with Claudia Olivetti and Daniele Paserman), Explorations in Economic History, Forthcoming.
[go to paper]

2018

"Ideology and Migration after the American Civil War" (with Shari Eli and Allison Shertzer), Journal of Economic History, Forthcoming.
[go to working paper]

2018

"Local Information, Income Segregation, and Geographic Mobility" (with Timothy N. Bond) The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy, Forthcoming.
[go to paper]

2018

"Women's Income and Marriage Markets in the United States: Evidence from the Civil War Pension," Journal of Economic History 77, no. 1 (2017), pp 1-38.
[go to paper]

2017

"Patronage Politics and the Development of the Welfare State: Confederate Pensions in the American South" (with Shari Eli), Journal of Economic History 76, no. 4 (2016), pp 1078-1112.
[go to paper]

2016

"Selective Migration, Wages, and Occupational Mobility in Nineteenth Century America," Explorations in Economic History, 53 (2014), pp 40-63.
[go to paper]

2014


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2018 AP/ECON3259 3.0 A Labour Economics: Institutions(Writing) LECT
Fall 2018 AP/ECON3210 3.0 B Use of Economic Data LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2019 AP/ECON4659 3.0 M North American Economic History LECT
Winter 2019 AP/ECON3210 3.0 M Use of Economic Data LECT