maitra


Sudeshna Maitra

Photo of Sudeshna Maitra

Department of Economics

Assistant Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1038
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 77052
Email: maitra@yorku.ca


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. I hold a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. My research interests are in development economics and health economics.

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Publication
Year

Can patient self-management explain the health gradient? Goldman and Smith's "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?" (2002) revisited.
Social Science and Medicine , 70(6), March 2010, pp. 802-812
Abstract: In their much-cited paper, "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?", Goldman and Smith (2002) use samples of diabetic and HIV+ patients in the United States to conclude that disease self-management is an important explanation for the much-documented positive gradient in education and health outcomes. In this paper, I revisit their analysis and point to some fundamental difficulties in interpreting their results as conclusive evidence in favor of self-management. I also argue that for individuals for whom self-management might be expected to matter -i.e. populations of patients managing complex conditions - economic factors such as resource availability and insurance access might be a more important mechanism behind the gradient than medical compliance. The impact of self-management, though it might matter, is likely to be small.
[go to paper]

Does Parental Education Protect Child Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In B. Basu, B.K. Chakrabarti, S.R. Chakravarty, and K. Gangopadhyay (Eds.) Econophysics & Economics of Games, Social Choices and Quantitative Techniques , (Springer, 2010), pp. 213-232
Abstract: The role of parental education in influencing child health outcomes has received much attention in the development literature. In this paper, I ask if parental education is protective of child health, as measured by seven different health outcomes, in a recent survey conducted in rural Udaipur. This study differs from most previous research in that it offers insight on the impact of parental education on the health of older children (aged 0-13) instead of infants alone and that it explores the relationship for multiple instead of only one or two diverse measures of child health. I show that the overall effect of parental education on child health is weak and that this finding could, in part, be driven by a failure of better parental health behaviors to lead to better child health outcomes, even though parental education is strongly associated with these better behaviors.
[go to paper]

Is Socioeconomic Status Protective of Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In K.P. Sujit (Ed.) Poverty, Health and Development , (New Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers, 2009), pp. 69-94



I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. I hold a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. My research interests are in development economics and health economics.

All Publications


Other

Publication
Year

Can patient self-management explain the health gradient? Goldman and Smith's "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?" (2002) revisited.
Social Science and Medicine , 70(6), March 2010, pp. 802-812
Abstract: In their much-cited paper, "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?", Goldman and Smith (2002) use samples of diabetic and HIV+ patients in the United States to conclude that disease self-management is an important explanation for the much-documented positive gradient in education and health outcomes. In this paper, I revisit their analysis and point to some fundamental difficulties in interpreting their results as conclusive evidence in favor of self-management. I also argue that for individuals for whom self-management might be expected to matter -i.e. populations of patients managing complex conditions - economic factors such as resource availability and insurance access might be a more important mechanism behind the gradient than medical compliance. The impact of self-management, though it might matter, is likely to be small.
[go to paper]

Does Parental Education Protect Child Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In B. Basu, B.K. Chakrabarti, S.R. Chakravarty, and K. Gangopadhyay (Eds.) Econophysics & Economics of Games, Social Choices and Quantitative Techniques , (Springer, 2010), pp. 213-232
Abstract: The role of parental education in influencing child health outcomes has received much attention in the development literature. In this paper, I ask if parental education is protective of child health, as measured by seven different health outcomes, in a recent survey conducted in rural Udaipur. This study differs from most previous research in that it offers insight on the impact of parental education on the health of older children (aged 0-13) instead of infants alone and that it explores the relationship for multiple instead of only one or two diverse measures of child health. I show that the overall effect of parental education on child health is weak and that this finding could, in part, be driven by a failure of better parental health behaviors to lead to better child health outcomes, even though parental education is strongly associated with these better behaviors.
[go to paper]

Is Socioeconomic Status Protective of Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In K.P. Sujit (Ed.) Poverty, Health and Development , (New Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers, 2009), pp. 69-94