murrayk


Karen Bridget Murray

Photo of Karen Bridget Murray

Department of Politics

Associate Professor
Coordinator, Democratic Administration Diploma Program

Office: Ross Building, S665
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 30087
Email: murrayk@yorku.ca

Accepting New Graduate Students


I am the daughter of an Irish immigrant and the granddaughter of Volga German immigrants. For most of my life, I was unaware that my early years were spent as a visitor on the respective traditional territories of the Lkwungen, WSÁNEĆ, and Wyomilth Peoples. Later, I lived on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish Peoples, namely the shared traditional territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish), Tsleil-Waututh, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) and Kwikwetlem First Nations; and then on the traditional unceded territories of the Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik Peoples covered by Treaties of Peace and Friendship. Today, I live and work on the territories of many Indigenous Nations at Tkaronto: the Wendat, the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Mississauga of the New Credit First Nation, and the Métis.*

My work evaluates and theorizes changing norms and forms of modernity and the political and governmental implications of these transformations, both as they pertain to cities, as well as to the governance of families and children, including with respect to the residential school system. One of the central foci of my research is to render visible and subvert hierarchical power relations produced through classifications of populations (e.g., "single mothers," "vulnerable populations") and places ("the urban"). In recent years, I have begun to evaluate these dynamics through the lens of the "colonial present" in Canada and beyond.

I am presently working on three separate lines of inquiry. The first is a transnational study of post-industrial urban governance in Boston, Dublin and Vancouver. The second is an examination of politics and epigenetics in relation to the category of "vulnerable populations" in the colonial present, including with respect to questions of territorial jurisdiction. The third concerns teaching and learning in political science, including a focus on experiential education and decolonizing pedagogies and practices. Selected publications reflecting on some of these various themes underpinning my work can be found in BC Studies, Canadian Historical Review, Urban Geography, Canadian Journal of Political Science, and, forthcoming, in the Canadian Journal of Sociology.

*These land acknowledgements are based upon the Canadian Association of University Teachers' "Guide to Acknowledging First Peoples and Traditional Territories." Available via Google.

More...

Degrees

PhD, University of British Columbia
MA, University of Toronto
BA, University of Toronto

Appointments

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Research Interests

, Canada and modernity in transnational perspective; comparative urban governance; the governance of families and children; "reconciliation;" decolonization; the residential school system; bio-medicine (especially epigenetics) and politics; experiential education and decolonizing pedagogies in the study of politics.

Current Research Projects


    See more
Modern Statehood and the Residential School System

    Summary:

    In my recent article in the CANADIAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, I examine the relationship between the pan-territorial residential school ideal and Canada's quest for recognition as a modern state. Related research: "The Silence of Urban Aboriginal Policy in New Brunswick,"in URBAN ABORIGINAL POLICY MAKING IN CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES, Evelyn Peters, ed. (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2012) ; "Reclaiming the People’s Memory," CANADA WATCH (2015), http://robarts.info.yorku.ca/files/2015/09/CW_Fall2015_FINAL.pdf; and "Facing Down R. B. Bennett," ActiveHistory.ca.

    See more
Biopolitics and Reproduction

    Summary:

    Related research: "Governing ‘Unwed Mothers’ in Toronto at the Turn of the Twentieth Century," THE CANADIAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, 85, 2 (2004): 253-276; "Do Not Disturb: ‘Vulnerable Populations’ in Canadian Federal Government Policy Discourses and Practices," CANADIAN JOURNAL OF URBAN RESEARCH, 13, 1 (2004): 50-69; "Governmentality and the Shifting Winds of Policy Studies," CRITICAL PUBLIC POLICY: CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES, M. Smith and M. Orsini, eds. (Vancouver: UBC Press) : 161-184; "Bio-gentrification: Vulnerability Bio-value Chains in Gentrifying Neighbourhoods," URBAN GEOGRAPHY, 36, 2: 277-299.

    See more
Governing Poverty in the Post-Industrial City

    Summary:

    This study aims to document the governmental and political character and implications of shifting poverty mentalities, practices and dynamics in post-industrial inner-city locales (Boston, Dublin and Vancouver). The research documents and analyzes how certain people and places are rendered governmentally visible in relation to poverty and its various elements of disadvantage, often in ways that dovetail with gendered and racialized divisions. Methodologically, this research involves extensive archival research, field interviews, and photography. Theoretically, the objective is to understand how shifting forms of urban poverty governance relate to changing notions of democracy and citizenship, including the extent to which poverty and disadvantage become fields for authoritarian practices. Politically, this research unsettles conventional policy discourses and practices, as well as mainstream policy silos, by investigating how urban poverty governance aligns with wider political aims, such as the production of wealth, the securing of a willing and able workforce, and the promotion of order and stability. In this way, this research strives to open up space for new ways of thinking and acting upon mass inequalities that define the global present. Related research: "Bio-gentrification: Vulnerability Bio-value Chains in Gentrifying Neighbourhoods," URBAN GEOGRAPHY, 36, 2 (2015): 277-299; "The Silence of Urban Aboriginal Policy in New Brunswick," in URBAN ABORIGINAL POLICY MAKING IN CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES, Evelyn Peters, ed. (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press) ; "Making Space in Vancouver’s East End from Leonard Marsh to the Vancouver Agreement," BC STUDIES, 169 (2011), 7-49; "From Africville to Globalville: Race, Poverty, and Urban Governance in Halifax, Nova Scotia," in RACE, NEIGHBORHOODS, AND THE MISUSE OF SOCIAL CAPITAL, James Jennings, ed. (New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2007) , 133-143; "The Voluntary Sector and the Realignment of Government: A Street-level Study," CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, 49, 3 (2006), 375-392 (With Jacqueline Low). Please also refer to the RELATIONAL POVERTY NETWORK website at http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/governing-urban-poverty-boston-dublin-vancouver/

    See more
Experiential Learning in Political Science

    Summary:

    This project aims to develop and apply experiential teaching and learning techniques to ignite in students a passion for studying politics and power. For further information on how I have used experiential learning, please see the Department of Political Science Newsletter (2015), p. 3, http://www.yorku.ca/laps/pols/documents/FINAL-2015LAPSPoliticalScienceNewsletter.pdf.

    See more
Books

Publication
Year

Robert Latham, Karen Bridget Murray, Julian von Bargen and A. T. Kingsmith, editors. Forthcoming. The Radical Left and Social Transformation: Strategies of Augmentation and Reorganization. Routledge.


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Governing ‘unwed mothers’ in Toronto at the turn of the twentieth century. In Regulating Sexuality in Early Twentieth Century: The Moral, The Normal, and the Deviant Sexuality in the Early 20th Century: The Canadian Historical Modules Project , Cynthia Comacchio, ed., http://www.visions.nelson.com/module/9780176584429_Module_47.pdf. Invited reprint of article first published in The Canadian Historical Review. PEER REVIEWED.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2012) . The silence of urban aboriginal policy in New Brunswick. In Urban Aboriginal Policy Making in the Municipalities (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press). See the open access penultimate version at The Relational Poverty Network: http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Murray_2015_pre-print.pdf. PEER REVIEWED.

2012

Karen Bridget Murray. (2008) .The patterning of political representation in Halifax. In Caroline Andrew, John Biles, Myer Siemiatycki, and Erin Tolley, eds. Electing a Diverse Canada: The Representation of Immigrants, Minorities and Women . Vancouver: UBC Press. PEER REVIEWED.

2008

Karen Bridget Murray. (2007) . Governmentality and the shifting winds of policy studies. In M. Smith and M. Orsini, eds. Critical Public Policy: Canadian Perspectives. pp. 161-184. Vancouver: UBC Press. PEER REVIEWED.

2007

Karen Bridget Murray. (2007) . From Africville to globalville: race, poverty, and urban governance in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In James Jennigs, ed. Race, Neighbourhoods, and the Misuse of Social Capital. pp. 133-143. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

2007

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . The realignment of government in the provinces. In Christopher Dunn, ed. Provinces: Canadian Provincial Politics, 2nd ed. Scarborough: Broadview Press, with student research assistance from Victoria Miernicki. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (1994) . A reconnaissance of Canadian administrative reform during the early 1990s. Co-author Evert Lindquist. Invited reprint of Canadian Public Administration article for Christopher Dunn, ed. Provinces: Canadian Provincial Politics, pp. 277-300. Scarborough: Broadview Press. PEER REVIEWED.

1994

Book Reviews

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Review of Colonial Genocide in North America, edited by Alexander Laban Hinton, Andrew Woolford, and Jeff Benvenuto (Durham, NC: Duke University Press), prepared for the Canadian Journal of History. 50, 3: 353-357.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2011/2012) . Review of Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Wordsworth, edited by Jane Pulkingham. BC Studies, 172: 141-145.

2011

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Review of Telling Tales: Living the Effects of Public Policy, edited by Sheila Neysmith, Kate Bezanson, and Anne O’Connell, Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, Atlantis, 31, 1.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Review of Tending the Gardens of Citizenship: Child Saving in Toronto, 1880s-1920s, by Xiaobei Chen (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005, Social History/Histoire Sociale, 39, 77.

2006

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. forthcoming. Epigenetics and the Colonial Present. Canadian Journal of Sociology.

2019

A. T. Kingsmith, Julian von Bargen, Karen Bridget Murray, and Robert Latham. Augmenting the Left. 2018. Global Discourse, 8 (2).

2018

Karen Bridget Murray. 2017. The violence within: Canadian modern statehood and the pan-territorial residential school ideal. Canadian Journal of Political Science. PEER REVIEWED. Nominated for the John McMenemy best article prize.

2017

Karen Bridget Murray. (2016) . Excavating working-class histories in Dublin. Genealogical Society of Ireland Journal, 17: 25-32.

2016

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Bio-gentrification: vulnerability bio-value chains in gentrifying neighbourhoods. Urban Geography, 36, 2: 277-299. See the open access penultimate version available at The Relational Poverty Network, http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/bio-gentrification-vulnerability-bio-value-chains-in-gentrifying-neighbourhoods/ PEER REVIEWED.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Reclaiming the people’s memory. In Jody Berland, ed. Canada Watch: The Politics of Evidence, http://robarts.info.yorku.ca/canada-watch/.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Facing down R. B. Bennett, ActiveHistory.ca, September 30, http://activehistory.ca/2015/09/facing-down-r-b-bennett/.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Reclaiming the people's memory, ActiveHistory.ca. Invited reprint of article published in Canada Watch: The Politics of Evidence, September 23, 2015, http://activehistory.ca/2015/09/reclaiming-the-peoples-memory/

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2014) . Feminization through poverty. Politics and Culture: Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalisms, March 10, https://politicsandculture.org/2014/03/10/feminization-through-poverty-by-karen-bridget-murray/. PEER REVIEWED.

2014

Karen Bridget Murray. (2011) . Making space in Vancouver’s East End from Leonard Marsh to the Vancouver Agreement." BC Studies, 169: 7-49, http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/bcstudies/article/viewFile/446/2301. PEER REVIEWED.

2011

Karen Bridget Murray. (2010) . Urban poverty and spatialized governmentalities in Vancouver: a study of Grandview Woodland, Transdisciplinary Studies in Population Health, 2, 2: 98-111.

2010

Karen Bridget Murray, et al. (2006) . The voluntary sector and the realignment of government: a street-level study. Canadian Public Administration, 49, 3, 375-392. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Lay acquiescence to medical dominance: reflections on the active citizenship thesis. Social Theory and Health, 4, 2: 109-127. With Jacqueline Low. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . Too little, too slow, too late: raining on the Human Rights Act amendment parade in New Brunswick. Canadian Review of Social Policy, 55: 27-31.

2005

Karen Bridget Murray. (2004) . Governing ‘unwed mothers’ in Toronto at the turn of the twentieth century. Canadian Historical Review, 85, 2: 253-276. PEER REVIEWED.

2004

Karen Bridget Murray. (2004) . Do not disturb: "vulnerable populations" in Canadian federal government policy discourses and practices. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 13, 1: 50-69. PEER REVIEWED.

2004

Karen Bridget Murray. (1994) . A reconnaissance of Canadian administrative reform during the early 1990s. Canadian Public Administration, 37, 3: 468-489, with Evert Lindquist. PEER REVIEWED.

1994

Policy Papers

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2008) . Challenging discourses in health policy research: the case of "lone mothers." Halifax: Centre for Excellence in Women's Health, pp. 1-12, http://www.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/ace-women-health/ACEWH_health_policy_lone_mothers.pdf

2008

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . Grandview Woodland (Vancouver): summary of results. Prepared for the Health, Governance and Citizenship Project, University of New Brunswick (Fredericton), with Margaret Condon of the Social Planning and Research Council of British Columbia.

2005

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . The toils of two cities: governing health and citizenship in Fredericton and Saint John, New Brunswick. Report funded by the Department of Health, Province of New Brunswick.

2005

Other

Publication
Year

Augmenting the Left, Special Edition of Global Discourse, 8(2), guest edited by A.T. Kingsmith, Julian von Bargen, Karen Bridget Murray and Robert Latham.

2018

Interview with 2018 John McMenemy Prize Nominee: Karen Bridget Murray, Blog post, Canadian Journal of Political Science.

2018

Approach to Teaching


My teaching is premised upon the understanding that learning is collaborative and best pursued experientially. The pedagogical objective is to create opportunities for shared learning, skills development, and the creation of new knowledge that helps us grasp the character of power dynamics operating in relation to the potential for freedom and justice in Canada and beyond. For a discussion of some of the ways that I have incorporated experiential learning at the undergraduate level, please see the Department of Political Science Newsletter (2015), p. 3, http://www.yorku.ca/laps/pols/documents/FINAL-2015LAPSPoliticalScienceNewsletter.pdf.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2018 GS/POLS6155 3.0 A Democratic Administration SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2019 AP/POLS3110 3.0 M The Process of Urban Politics I LECT
Winter 2019 AP/POLS4110 3.0 M Canadian Urban Policy SEMR
Winter 2019 AP/POLS4404 3.0 M Neoliberal Urbanism SEMR
Winter 2019 GS/POLS6185 3.0 M Governing Urban Poverty SEMR


I am the daughter of an Irish immigrant and the granddaughter of Volga German immigrants. For most of my life, I was unaware that my early years were spent as a visitor on the respective traditional territories of the Lkwungen, WSÁNEĆ, and Wyomilth Peoples. Later, I lived on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish Peoples, namely the shared traditional territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish), Tsleil-Waututh, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) and Kwikwetlem First Nations; and then on the traditional unceded territories of the Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik Peoples covered by Treaties of Peace and Friendship. Today, I live and work on the territories of many Indigenous Nations at Tkaronto: the Wendat, the Anishinabek Nation, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, the Mississauga of the New Credit First Nation, and the Métis.*

My work evaluates and theorizes changing norms and forms of modernity and the political and governmental implications of these transformations, both as they pertain to cities, as well as to the governance of families and children, including with respect to the residential school system. One of the central foci of my research is to render visible and subvert hierarchical power relations produced through classifications of populations (e.g., "single mothers," "vulnerable populations") and places ("the urban"). In recent years, I have begun to evaluate these dynamics through the lens of the "colonial present" in Canada and beyond.

I am presently working on three separate lines of inquiry. The first is a transnational study of post-industrial urban governance in Boston, Dublin and Vancouver. The second is an examination of politics and epigenetics in relation to the category of "vulnerable populations" in the colonial present, including with respect to questions of territorial jurisdiction. The third concerns teaching and learning in political science, including a focus on experiential education and decolonizing pedagogies and practices. Selected publications reflecting on some of these various themes underpinning my work can be found in BC Studies, Canadian Historical Review, Urban Geography, Canadian Journal of Political Science, and, forthcoming, in the Canadian Journal of Sociology.

*These land acknowledgements are based upon the Canadian Association of University Teachers' "Guide to Acknowledging First Peoples and Traditional Territories." Available via Google.

Degrees

PhD, University of British Columbia
MA, University of Toronto
BA, University of Toronto

Appointments

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Research Interests

, Canada and modernity in transnational perspective; comparative urban governance; the governance of families and children; "reconciliation;" decolonization; the residential school system; bio-medicine (especially epigenetics) and politics; experiential education and decolonizing pedagogies in the study of politics.

Current Research Projects


Modern Statehood and the Residential School System

    Summary:

    In my recent article in the CANADIAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, I examine the relationship between the pan-territorial residential school ideal and Canada's quest for recognition as a modern state. Related research: "The Silence of Urban Aboriginal Policy in New Brunswick,"in URBAN ABORIGINAL POLICY MAKING IN CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES, Evelyn Peters, ed. (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2012) ; "Reclaiming the People’s Memory," CANADA WATCH (2015), http://robarts.info.yorku.ca/files/2015/09/CW_Fall2015_FINAL.pdf; and "Facing Down R. B. Bennett," ActiveHistory.ca.

Biopolitics and Reproduction

    Summary:

    Related research: "Governing ‘Unwed Mothers’ in Toronto at the Turn of the Twentieth Century," THE CANADIAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, 85, 2 (2004): 253-276; "Do Not Disturb: ‘Vulnerable Populations’ in Canadian Federal Government Policy Discourses and Practices," CANADIAN JOURNAL OF URBAN RESEARCH, 13, 1 (2004): 50-69; "Governmentality and the Shifting Winds of Policy Studies," CRITICAL PUBLIC POLICY: CANADIAN PERSPECTIVES, M. Smith and M. Orsini, eds. (Vancouver: UBC Press) : 161-184; "Bio-gentrification: Vulnerability Bio-value Chains in Gentrifying Neighbourhoods," URBAN GEOGRAPHY, 36, 2: 277-299.

Governing Poverty in the Post-Industrial City

    Summary:

    This study aims to document the governmental and political character and implications of shifting poverty mentalities, practices and dynamics in post-industrial inner-city locales (Boston, Dublin and Vancouver). The research documents and analyzes how certain people and places are rendered governmentally visible in relation to poverty and its various elements of disadvantage, often in ways that dovetail with gendered and racialized divisions. Methodologically, this research involves extensive archival research, field interviews, and photography. Theoretically, the objective is to understand how shifting forms of urban poverty governance relate to changing notions of democracy and citizenship, including the extent to which poverty and disadvantage become fields for authoritarian practices. Politically, this research unsettles conventional policy discourses and practices, as well as mainstream policy silos, by investigating how urban poverty governance aligns with wider political aims, such as the production of wealth, the securing of a willing and able workforce, and the promotion of order and stability. In this way, this research strives to open up space for new ways of thinking and acting upon mass inequalities that define the global present. Related research: "Bio-gentrification: Vulnerability Bio-value Chains in Gentrifying Neighbourhoods," URBAN GEOGRAPHY, 36, 2 (2015): 277-299; "The Silence of Urban Aboriginal Policy in New Brunswick," in URBAN ABORIGINAL POLICY MAKING IN CANADIAN MUNICIPALITIES, Evelyn Peters, ed. (Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press) ; "Making Space in Vancouver’s East End from Leonard Marsh to the Vancouver Agreement," BC STUDIES, 169 (2011), 7-49; "From Africville to Globalville: Race, Poverty, and Urban Governance in Halifax, Nova Scotia," in RACE, NEIGHBORHOODS, AND THE MISUSE OF SOCIAL CAPITAL, James Jennings, ed. (New York: Plagrave Macmillan, 2007) , 133-143; "The Voluntary Sector and the Realignment of Government: A Street-level Study," CANADIAN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, 49, 3 (2006), 375-392 (With Jacqueline Low). Please also refer to the RELATIONAL POVERTY NETWORK website at http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/governing-urban-poverty-boston-dublin-vancouver/

Experiential Learning in Political Science

    Summary:

    This project aims to develop and apply experiential teaching and learning techniques to ignite in students a passion for studying politics and power. For further information on how I have used experiential learning, please see the Department of Political Science Newsletter (2015), p. 3, http://www.yorku.ca/laps/pols/documents/FINAL-2015LAPSPoliticalScienceNewsletter.pdf.

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Governing ‘unwed mothers’ in Toronto at the turn of the twentieth century. In Regulating Sexuality in Early Twentieth Century: The Moral, The Normal, and the Deviant Sexuality in the Early 20th Century: The Canadian Historical Modules Project , Cynthia Comacchio, ed., http://www.visions.nelson.com/module/9780176584429_Module_47.pdf. Invited reprint of article first published in The Canadian Historical Review. PEER REVIEWED.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2012) . The silence of urban aboriginal policy in New Brunswick. In Urban Aboriginal Policy Making in the Municipalities (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press). See the open access penultimate version at The Relational Poverty Network: http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Murray_2015_pre-print.pdf. PEER REVIEWED.

2012

Karen Bridget Murray. (2008) .The patterning of political representation in Halifax. In Caroline Andrew, John Biles, Myer Siemiatycki, and Erin Tolley, eds. Electing a Diverse Canada: The Representation of Immigrants, Minorities and Women . Vancouver: UBC Press. PEER REVIEWED.

2008

Karen Bridget Murray. (2007) . Governmentality and the shifting winds of policy studies. In M. Smith and M. Orsini, eds. Critical Public Policy: Canadian Perspectives. pp. 161-184. Vancouver: UBC Press. PEER REVIEWED.

2007

Karen Bridget Murray. (2007) . From Africville to globalville: race, poverty, and urban governance in Halifax, Nova Scotia. In James Jennigs, ed. Race, Neighbourhoods, and the Misuse of Social Capital. pp. 133-143. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

2007

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . The realignment of government in the provinces. In Christopher Dunn, ed. Provinces: Canadian Provincial Politics, 2nd ed. Scarborough: Broadview Press, with student research assistance from Victoria Miernicki. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (1994) . A reconnaissance of Canadian administrative reform during the early 1990s. Co-author Evert Lindquist. Invited reprint of Canadian Public Administration article for Christopher Dunn, ed. Provinces: Canadian Provincial Politics, pp. 277-300. Scarborough: Broadview Press. PEER REVIEWED.

1994

Book Reviews

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Review of Colonial Genocide in North America, edited by Alexander Laban Hinton, Andrew Woolford, and Jeff Benvenuto (Durham, NC: Duke University Press), prepared for the Canadian Journal of History. 50, 3: 353-357.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2011/2012) . Review of Human Welfare, Rights, and Social Activism: Rethinking the Legacy of J.S. Wordsworth, edited by Jane Pulkingham. BC Studies, 172: 141-145.

2011

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Review of Telling Tales: Living the Effects of Public Policy, edited by Sheila Neysmith, Kate Bezanson, and Anne O’Connell, Halifax: Fernwood Publishing, Atlantis, 31, 1.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Review of Tending the Gardens of Citizenship: Child Saving in Toronto, 1880s-1920s, by Xiaobei Chen (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005, Social History/Histoire Sociale, 39, 77.

2006

Books

Publication
Year

Robert Latham, Karen Bridget Murray, Julian von Bargen and A. T. Kingsmith, editors. Forthcoming. The Radical Left and Social Transformation: Strategies of Augmentation and Reorganization. Routledge.


Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. forthcoming. Epigenetics and the Colonial Present. Canadian Journal of Sociology.

2019

A. T. Kingsmith, Julian von Bargen, Karen Bridget Murray, and Robert Latham. Augmenting the Left. 2018. Global Discourse, 8 (2).

2018

Karen Bridget Murray. 2017. The violence within: Canadian modern statehood and the pan-territorial residential school ideal. Canadian Journal of Political Science. PEER REVIEWED. Nominated for the John McMenemy best article prize.

2017

Karen Bridget Murray. (2016) . Excavating working-class histories in Dublin. Genealogical Society of Ireland Journal, 17: 25-32.

2016

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Bio-gentrification: vulnerability bio-value chains in gentrifying neighbourhoods. Urban Geography, 36, 2: 277-299. See the open access penultimate version available at The Relational Poverty Network, http://depts.washington.edu/relpov/bio-gentrification-vulnerability-bio-value-chains-in-gentrifying-neighbourhoods/ PEER REVIEWED.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Reclaiming the people’s memory. In Jody Berland, ed. Canada Watch: The Politics of Evidence, http://robarts.info.yorku.ca/canada-watch/.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Facing down R. B. Bennett, ActiveHistory.ca, September 30, http://activehistory.ca/2015/09/facing-down-r-b-bennett/.

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2015) . Reclaiming the people's memory, ActiveHistory.ca. Invited reprint of article published in Canada Watch: The Politics of Evidence, September 23, 2015, http://activehistory.ca/2015/09/reclaiming-the-peoples-memory/

2015

Karen Bridget Murray. (2014) . Feminization through poverty. Politics and Culture: Materialist Feminisms against Neoliberalisms, March 10, https://politicsandculture.org/2014/03/10/feminization-through-poverty-by-karen-bridget-murray/. PEER REVIEWED.

2014

Karen Bridget Murray. (2011) . Making space in Vancouver’s East End from Leonard Marsh to the Vancouver Agreement." BC Studies, 169: 7-49, http://ojs.library.ubc.ca/index.php/bcstudies/article/viewFile/446/2301. PEER REVIEWED.

2011

Karen Bridget Murray. (2010) . Urban poverty and spatialized governmentalities in Vancouver: a study of Grandview Woodland, Transdisciplinary Studies in Population Health, 2, 2: 98-111.

2010

Karen Bridget Murray, et al. (2006) . The voluntary sector and the realignment of government: a street-level study. Canadian Public Administration, 49, 3, 375-392. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2006) . Lay acquiescence to medical dominance: reflections on the active citizenship thesis. Social Theory and Health, 4, 2: 109-127. With Jacqueline Low. PEER REVIEWED.

2006

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . Too little, too slow, too late: raining on the Human Rights Act amendment parade in New Brunswick. Canadian Review of Social Policy, 55: 27-31.

2005

Karen Bridget Murray. (2004) . Governing ‘unwed mothers’ in Toronto at the turn of the twentieth century. Canadian Historical Review, 85, 2: 253-276. PEER REVIEWED.

2004

Karen Bridget Murray. (2004) . Do not disturb: "vulnerable populations" in Canadian federal government policy discourses and practices. Canadian Journal of Urban Research, 13, 1: 50-69. PEER REVIEWED.

2004

Karen Bridget Murray. (1994) . A reconnaissance of Canadian administrative reform during the early 1990s. Canadian Public Administration, 37, 3: 468-489, with Evert Lindquist. PEER REVIEWED.

1994

Policy Papers

Publication
Year

Karen Bridget Murray. (2008) . Challenging discourses in health policy research: the case of "lone mothers." Halifax: Centre for Excellence in Women's Health, pp. 1-12, http://www.dal.ca/content/dam/dalhousie/pdf/ace-women-health/ACEWH_health_policy_lone_mothers.pdf

2008

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . Grandview Woodland (Vancouver): summary of results. Prepared for the Health, Governance and Citizenship Project, University of New Brunswick (Fredericton), with Margaret Condon of the Social Planning and Research Council of British Columbia.

2005

Karen Bridget Murray. (2005) . The toils of two cities: governing health and citizenship in Fredericton and Saint John, New Brunswick. Report funded by the Department of Health, Province of New Brunswick.

2005

Other

Publication
Year

Augmenting the Left, Special Edition of Global Discourse, 8(2), guest edited by A.T. Kingsmith, Julian von Bargen, Karen Bridget Murray and Robert Latham.

2018

Interview with 2018 John McMenemy Prize Nominee: Karen Bridget Murray, Blog post, Canadian Journal of Political Science.

2018

Approach to Teaching


My teaching is premised upon the understanding that learning is collaborative and best pursued experientially. The pedagogical objective is to create opportunities for shared learning, skills development, and the creation of new knowledge that helps us grasp the character of power dynamics operating in relation to the potential for freedom and justice in Canada and beyond. For a discussion of some of the ways that I have incorporated experiential learning at the undergraduate level, please see the Department of Political Science Newsletter (2015), p. 3, http://www.yorku.ca/laps/pols/documents/FINAL-2015LAPSPoliticalScienceNewsletter.pdf.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2018 GS/POLS6155 3.0 A Democratic Administration SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2019 AP/POLS3110 3.0 M The Process of Urban Politics I LECT
Winter 2019 AP/POLS4110 3.0 M Canadian Urban Policy SEMR
Winter 2019 AP/POLS4404 3.0 M Neoliberal Urbanism SEMR
Winter 2019 GS/POLS6185 3.0 M Governing Urban Poverty SEMR