corcora2


James Corcoran

Photo of James Corcoran

Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics

Assistant Professor

Office: Ross Building, S533
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext: 44518
Email: corcora2@yorku.ca
Primary website: ResearchGate

Accepting New Graduate Students


I am an Assistant Professor of English as a Second Language & Applied Linguistics in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at York University. My research interests include language teacher education, (critical) English for specific/academic purposes, and relations of power in global academic knowledge production. My current research projects include investigations into i) the long term impact of research writing interventions; ii) the political economy of post-secondary language teaching; iii) the impact of various pedagogical interventions on plurilingual EAL students' learning outcomes; iv) faculty "editing" processes, practices, and ideologies; and v) EAP teachers' pedagogies for supporting diverse students' academic literacies. My recent publications include an article in Written Communication as well as two books published with Routledge. My teaching includes work with plurilingual undergraduate students, graduate students, and language teacher candidates. *Currently accepting PhD candidate supervisees **Additional Languages: Portuguese; Spanish; French

More...

I am an Assistant Professor of English as a Second Language and Applied Linguistics in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at York University. My research interests include language teacher education, (critical) English for specific/academic purposes, and relations of power in global academic knowledge production. My current research projects include investigations into i) the long term impact of research writing interventions; ii) the political economy of post-secondary English language teaching; iii) the impact of various pedagogical interventions on plurilingual EAL students' learning outcomes; iv) EAP teachers' pedagogies for supporting diverse students' academic literacies. My recent publications include an article in Written Communication as well as two books published with Routledge. My teaching includes work with plurilingual undergraduate students, graduate students, and language teacher candidates. *Currently accepting PhD candidate supervisees **Additional Languages: Portuguese; Spanish; French

Degrees

PhD in Language & Literacy Education, OISE/University of Toronto
MA in Second Language Education, OISE/University of Toronto
BEd in Teaching English as a Second Language, McGill University

Research Interests

Linguistics , Education, Writing, Language Teacher Education, Critical English for Specific / Academic Purposes, Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research

Current Research Projects

English for Research Publication Purposes: The Longer Term Impact of Pedagogical Interventions

    Summary:

    A qualitative investigation of the longer term impact of a particular intensive pedagogical intervention on plurilingual scientists' research writing beliefs, practices, and outcomes.

    See more
    Role: Lead Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2019

English for Academic Purposes across Canada: Charting the Post-Secondary Landscape

    Summary:

    Mixed methods investigation into the diverse English as an additional language programming taking place at Canadian colleges and universities. This investigation also endeavours to better understand the lived experiences and professional satisfaction of EAP administrators and instructors at Canadian post-secondary institutions.

    See more
    Role: Lead Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Sep   Year: 2019

    Collaborator: Julia Williams
    Collaborator Institution: Renison University College - University of Waterloo
    Funders:
    SSHRC Explore
Books

Publication
Year

Scholars who use English as an additional language confront challenges when disseminating their research in the global market of knowledge production dominated by English. English for Research Publication Purposes analyses the experiences and practices of these scholars across the globe and presents "critical plurilingual pedagogies" as a theoretically and empirically informed means of supporting them. This book:

• Draws on an empirical study of a Latin American university’s effort to mount a course that provides support to emerging and established scholars who use English as an additional language;

• Brings theoretically informed discussions of critical pedagogies, plurilingualism and identity affirmation to better serve plurilingual scholars who seek to publish their research in English-language journals;

• Provides examples of classroom activities that can be adapted and adopted to local contexts and realities in a curriculum based on critical plurilingual pedagogies;

• Proposes future directions for research into the internationally urgent, growing concerns of global scholars who produce English-medium academic knowledge for the world stage.

Incisive and cutting-edge, English for Research Publication Purposes will be key reading for academics and upper-level students working in the areas of ESP, EAP, ERPP, and Applied Linguistics.

2019

Offering a nuanced examination of the complex landscape that international scholars who publish their research in English must navigate, this edited volume details 17 perspectives on scholarly writing for publication across seven geolinguistic regions. This innovative volume includes first-hand accounts and analyses written by local scholars and pedagogues living and working outside Anglophone centres of global knowledge production. The book provides an in-depth look into the deeply contextualized pedagogical activities that support English-language publishing. It also brings much-needed insight to discussions of policies and practices of global scholarly research writing. Bookended by the editors’ introductory overview of this burgeoning field and an envoi by the eminent applied linguist John M. Swales, the diverse contributions in this volume will appeal to scholars who use English as an additional language, as well as to researchers, instructors, and policymakers involved in the production, support, and adjudication of global scholars’ research writing.

2019

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

This article explores emergent tropes from conversations between a language teacher educator and three plurilingual language teacher candidates on the impact of creating a digital autobiographical identity text (D-AIT), a multimodal digital ‘text’ constructed to reflect their hybrid and evolving professional identities. In attempting to better understand the complex potential of this type of digital storytelling in the language teacher education classroom, we discuss at length several salient themes emerging from our polyvocal, or multi-voice data. These themes include the immediate and enduring impact of D-AIT production on language teacher candidates’ professional identities; the impact of this plurilingual pedagogy on both teachers’ and students’ academic literacies; and the potential of multiethnographic, polyvocal research to empower teacher-researchers. We conclude the article with, i) tips for using D-AITs in order to support culturally and linguistically diverse language teacher candidates and students; as well as ii) suggestions for how our participatory methodological approach may contribute to scholarly conversations and teacher practices.

2020

This article outlines findings from a case study investigating attitudes toward
English as the dominant language of scientific research writing. Survey and
interview data were collected from 55 Latin American health and life scientists
and 7 North American scientific journal editors connected to an intensive
scholarly writing for publication course. Study findings point to competing
perceptions (scientists vs. editors) of fairness in the adjudication of Latin
American scientists’ research at international scientific journals. Adopting a
critical, plurilingual lens, I argue that these findings demand a space for more
equity-driven pedagogies, policies, and reflective practices aimed at supporting
the robust participation of plurilingual scientists who use English as an
additional language (EAL). In particular, if equity is indeed a shared goal, there
is a clear need for commitment to ongoing critical self-reflection on the part of
scientific journal gatekeepers and research writing support specialists.

2019

This article outlines findings from a case study investigating attitudes toward
English as the dominant language of scientific research writing. Survey and
interview data were collected from 55 Latin American health and life scientists
and 7 North American scientific journal editors connected to an intensive
scholarly writing for publication course. Study findings point to competing
perceptions (scientists vs. editors) of fairness in the adjudication of Latin
American scientists’ research at international scientific journals. Adopting a
critical, plurilingual lens, I argue that these findings demand a space for more
equity-driven pedagogies, policies, and reflective practices aimed at supporting
the robust participation of plurilingual scientists who use English as an
additional language (EAL). In particular, if equity is indeed a shared goal, there
is a clear need for commitment to ongoing critical self-reflection on the part of
scientific journal gatekeepers and research writing support specialists.

2019

Approach to Teaching


I am interested in developing students' academic literacies, including their ability to effectively communicate within their disciplinary communities. My approach includes facilitating development of critical thinking skills, whether it be at the undergraduate, graduate, or post-graduate level. My teaching responds to 21st century student needs and objectives, and strives to be dynamic and responsive to the ever changing nature of these needs in the "knowledge economy". I take a critical, plurilingual pedagogical approach that sees language(s) as "resource" rather than "problem", thus positioning scholars using English as an additional language as pluri-competent as they develop their awareness of how language can be used to create, maintain, and/or challenge relations of power.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/TESL3200 6.0 A Methodology of Teaching English SEMR
Fall 2020 GS/LAL5670 3.0 A Second Language Instruction SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/TESL3200 6.0 A Methodology of Teaching English SEMR
Winter 2021 GS/LAL6235 3.0 M English SpecificPurposes:Theory/Practice SEMR


I am an Assistant Professor of English as a Second Language & Applied Linguistics in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at York University. My research interests include language teacher education, (critical) English for specific/academic purposes, and relations of power in global academic knowledge production. My current research projects include investigations into i) the long term impact of research writing interventions; ii) the political economy of post-secondary language teaching; iii) the impact of various pedagogical interventions on plurilingual EAL students' learning outcomes; iv) faculty "editing" processes, practices, and ideologies; and v) EAP teachers' pedagogies for supporting diverse students' academic literacies. My recent publications include an article in Written Communication as well as two books published with Routledge. My teaching includes work with plurilingual undergraduate students, graduate students, and language teacher candidates. *Currently accepting PhD candidate supervisees **Additional Languages: Portuguese; Spanish; French

I am an Assistant Professor of English as a Second Language and Applied Linguistics in the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics at York University. My research interests include language teacher education, (critical) English for specific/academic purposes, and relations of power in global academic knowledge production. My current research projects include investigations into i) the long term impact of research writing interventions; ii) the political economy of post-secondary English language teaching; iii) the impact of various pedagogical interventions on plurilingual EAL students' learning outcomes; iv) EAP teachers' pedagogies for supporting diverse students' academic literacies. My recent publications include an article in Written Communication as well as two books published with Routledge. My teaching includes work with plurilingual undergraduate students, graduate students, and language teacher candidates. *Currently accepting PhD candidate supervisees **Additional Languages: Portuguese; Spanish; French

Degrees

PhD in Language & Literacy Education, OISE/University of Toronto
MA in Second Language Education, OISE/University of Toronto
BEd in Teaching English as a Second Language, McGill University

Research Interests

Linguistics , Education, Writing, Language Teacher Education, Critical English for Specific / Academic Purposes, Qualitative and Mixed Methods Research

Current Research Projects

English for Research Publication Purposes: The Longer Term Impact of Pedagogical Interventions

    Summary:

    A qualitative investigation of the longer term impact of a particular intensive pedagogical intervention on plurilingual scientists' research writing beliefs, practices, and outcomes.

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Lead Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2019

English for Academic Purposes across Canada: Charting the Post-Secondary Landscape

    Summary:

    Mixed methods investigation into the diverse English as an additional language programming taking place at Canadian colleges and universities. This investigation also endeavours to better understand the lived experiences and professional satisfaction of EAP administrators and instructors at Canadian post-secondary institutions.

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Lead Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Sep   Year: 2019

    Collaborator: Julia Williams
    Collaborator Institution: Renison University College - University of Waterloo
    Funders:
    SSHRC Explore

All Publications


Books

Publication
Year

Scholars who use English as an additional language confront challenges when disseminating their research in the global market of knowledge production dominated by English. English for Research Publication Purposes analyses the experiences and practices of these scholars across the globe and presents "critical plurilingual pedagogies" as a theoretically and empirically informed means of supporting them. This book:

• Draws on an empirical study of a Latin American university’s effort to mount a course that provides support to emerging and established scholars who use English as an additional language;

• Brings theoretically informed discussions of critical pedagogies, plurilingualism and identity affirmation to better serve plurilingual scholars who seek to publish their research in English-language journals;

• Provides examples of classroom activities that can be adapted and adopted to local contexts and realities in a curriculum based on critical plurilingual pedagogies;

• Proposes future directions for research into the internationally urgent, growing concerns of global scholars who produce English-medium academic knowledge for the world stage.

Incisive and cutting-edge, English for Research Publication Purposes will be key reading for academics and upper-level students working in the areas of ESP, EAP, ERPP, and Applied Linguistics.

2019

Offering a nuanced examination of the complex landscape that international scholars who publish their research in English must navigate, this edited volume details 17 perspectives on scholarly writing for publication across seven geolinguistic regions. This innovative volume includes first-hand accounts and analyses written by local scholars and pedagogues living and working outside Anglophone centres of global knowledge production. The book provides an in-depth look into the deeply contextualized pedagogical activities that support English-language publishing. It also brings much-needed insight to discussions of policies and practices of global scholarly research writing. Bookended by the editors’ introductory overview of this burgeoning field and an envoi by the eminent applied linguist John M. Swales, the diverse contributions in this volume will appeal to scholars who use English as an additional language, as well as to researchers, instructors, and policymakers involved in the production, support, and adjudication of global scholars’ research writing.

2019

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

This article explores emergent tropes from conversations between a language teacher educator and three plurilingual language teacher candidates on the impact of creating a digital autobiographical identity text (D-AIT), a multimodal digital ‘text’ constructed to reflect their hybrid and evolving professional identities. In attempting to better understand the complex potential of this type of digital storytelling in the language teacher education classroom, we discuss at length several salient themes emerging from our polyvocal, or multi-voice data. These themes include the immediate and enduring impact of D-AIT production on language teacher candidates’ professional identities; the impact of this plurilingual pedagogy on both teachers’ and students’ academic literacies; and the potential of multiethnographic, polyvocal research to empower teacher-researchers. We conclude the article with, i) tips for using D-AITs in order to support culturally and linguistically diverse language teacher candidates and students; as well as ii) suggestions for how our participatory methodological approach may contribute to scholarly conversations and teacher practices.

2020

This article outlines findings from a case study investigating attitudes toward
English as the dominant language of scientific research writing. Survey and
interview data were collected from 55 Latin American health and life scientists
and 7 North American scientific journal editors connected to an intensive
scholarly writing for publication course. Study findings point to competing
perceptions (scientists vs. editors) of fairness in the adjudication of Latin
American scientists’ research at international scientific journals. Adopting a
critical, plurilingual lens, I argue that these findings demand a space for more
equity-driven pedagogies, policies, and reflective practices aimed at supporting
the robust participation of plurilingual scientists who use English as an
additional language (EAL). In particular, if equity is indeed a shared goal, there
is a clear need for commitment to ongoing critical self-reflection on the part of
scientific journal gatekeepers and research writing support specialists.

2019

This article outlines findings from a case study investigating attitudes toward
English as the dominant language of scientific research writing. Survey and
interview data were collected from 55 Latin American health and life scientists
and 7 North American scientific journal editors connected to an intensive
scholarly writing for publication course. Study findings point to competing
perceptions (scientists vs. editors) of fairness in the adjudication of Latin
American scientists’ research at international scientific journals. Adopting a
critical, plurilingual lens, I argue that these findings demand a space for more
equity-driven pedagogies, policies, and reflective practices aimed at supporting
the robust participation of plurilingual scientists who use English as an
additional language (EAL). In particular, if equity is indeed a shared goal, there
is a clear need for commitment to ongoing critical self-reflection on the part of
scientific journal gatekeepers and research writing support specialists.

2019

Approach to Teaching


I am interested in developing students' academic literacies, including their ability to effectively communicate within their disciplinary communities. My approach includes facilitating development of critical thinking skills, whether it be at the undergraduate, graduate, or post-graduate level. My teaching responds to 21st century student needs and objectives, and strives to be dynamic and responsive to the ever changing nature of these needs in the "knowledge economy". I take a critical, plurilingual pedagogical approach that sees language(s) as "resource" rather than "problem", thus positioning scholars using English as an additional language as pluri-competent as they develop their awareness of how language can be used to create, maintain, and/or challenge relations of power.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/TESL3200 6.0 A Methodology of Teaching English SEMR
Fall 2020 GS/LAL5670 3.0 A Second Language Instruction SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/TESL3200 6.0 A Methodology of Teaching English SEMR
Winter 2021 GS/LAL6235 3.0 M English SpecificPurposes:Theory/Practice SEMR