kobriain


Katarina O’Briain

Photo of Katarina O’Briain

Department of English

Assistant Professor

Office: Atkinson Building, 620
Ext: 22147 Email: kobriain@yorku.ca


Katarina O’Briain specializes in transatlantic eighteenth-century literature and culture. She is at work on a book manuscript, titled Georgic Possibilities: Craft Labor and the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century, which examines the ways in which georgic poetry — often defined as the poetry of agricultural labor — imagines alternatives to racial capitalism in the long eighteenth century, as well as in twentieth and twenty-first-century activist, anticapitalist, and eco- poetry. This project ends by tracing the ways in which georgic poetry has been used to justify an ongoing history of dispossession and settler colonial violence in what is now called Canada. She has published articles relating to this research on the poetics of craft labor (ECF, 2018) and on the political economy of accident in the development of the novel (NOVEL, 2019).

Before joining York University, Katarina O’Briain taught courses in literary history, Black Atlantic literature, and research methodologies at St. Mary’s University, Calgary, where she received a Teaching Excellence Award in 2021. Her classes often center around the development of slow, close readings of texts to offer new perspectives on old works of literature and to think carefully about how some of the most urgent social questions of the eighteenth century live on in our present moment.

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Degrees

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
M.A., Johns Hopkins University
B.A., University of Alberta
Journal Articles

Publication
Year

“Frances Burney and the Art of Accident,” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction, vol. 52, no. 3, 2019, pp. 425–441.

2019

“Dryden’s Georgic Fictionality,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, vol. 30, no .3, 2018, pp. 317–38.

2018

Conference Papers

Publication
Year

“Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Craft Labor.” The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Denver (March 2019)

2019

“Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Georgic.” The American Comparative Literature Association, Washington DC (March 2019)

2019

“Swift’s Georgics of the South Sea.” The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Toronto (October 2017)

2017

“What is the Craft in Statecraft?; or, The Problem of Value in Dryden’s The Medall.” Modern Language Association, Austin (January 2016)

2016

“The Matter of Swift’s Poetry.” The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Williamsburg (March 2014)

2014

“Monarchical Aesthetics: The Form of the Sovereign in Alexander Pope’s Windsor Forest.” The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Edmonton (October 2012)

2012


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/EN4120 6.0 A The Rise of the Novel SEMR
Fall 2021 AP/EN2170 3.0 A Horror and Terror: Variations on Gothic REMT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2022 AP/EN4061 3.0 M Environmental Justice Literature SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/EN4120 6.0 A The Rise of the Novel SEMR


Katarina O’Briain specializes in transatlantic eighteenth-century literature and culture. She is at work on a book manuscript, titled Georgic Possibilities: Craft Labor and the Transatlantic Eighteenth Century, which examines the ways in which georgic poetry — often defined as the poetry of agricultural labor — imagines alternatives to racial capitalism in the long eighteenth century, as well as in twentieth and twenty-first-century activist, anticapitalist, and eco- poetry. This project ends by tracing the ways in which georgic poetry has been used to justify an ongoing history of dispossession and settler colonial violence in what is now called Canada. She has published articles relating to this research on the poetics of craft labor (ECF, 2018) and on the political economy of accident in the development of the novel (NOVEL, 2019).

Before joining York University, Katarina O’Briain taught courses in literary history, Black Atlantic literature, and research methodologies at St. Mary’s University, Calgary, where she received a Teaching Excellence Award in 2021. Her classes often center around the development of slow, close readings of texts to offer new perspectives on old works of literature and to think carefully about how some of the most urgent social questions of the eighteenth century live on in our present moment.

Degrees

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University
M.A., Johns Hopkins University
B.A., University of Alberta

All Publications


Journal Articles

Publication
Year

“Frances Burney and the Art of Accident,” NOVEL: A Forum on Fiction, vol. 52, no. 3, 2019, pp. 425–441.

2019

“Dryden’s Georgic Fictionality,” Eighteenth-Century Fiction, vol. 30, no .3, 2018, pp. 317–38.

2018

Conference Papers

Publication
Year

“Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Craft Labor.” The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Denver (March 2019)

2019

“Phillis Wheatley and the Limits of Georgic.” The American Comparative Literature Association, Washington DC (March 2019)

2019

“Swift’s Georgics of the South Sea.” The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Toronto (October 2017)

2017

“What is the Craft in Statecraft?; or, The Problem of Value in Dryden’s The Medall.” Modern Language Association, Austin (January 2016)

2016

“The Matter of Swift’s Poetry.” The American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Williamsburg (March 2014)

2014

“Monarchical Aesthetics: The Form of the Sovereign in Alexander Pope’s Windsor Forest.” The Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Edmonton (October 2012)

2012


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/EN4120 6.0 A The Rise of the Novel SEMR
Fall 2021 AP/EN2170 3.0 A Horror and Terror: Variations on Gothic REMT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2022 AP/EN4061 3.0 M Environmental Justice Literature SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/EN4120 6.0 A The Rise of the Novel SEMR