leobaska


Leo Baskatawang

Photo of Leo Baskatawang

Department of Social Science

Lecturer

Email: leobaska@yorku.ca


Leo Baskatawang is an Anishinaabe scholar from Lac Des Mille Lacs First Nation, who is an influential social activist, writer, as well as decorated combat veteran. Prior to beginning his academic career, Leo was enlisted in the United States Army as a member of the prestigious 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), at which time he completed two combat tours in support of the Global War On Terrorism and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2012, Leo initiated an activist movement called March 4 Justice, in which he walked from Vancouver to Ottawa, protesting the ‘Indian Act’. Leo is currently in the process of completing his PhD in Native Studies at the University of Manitoba, where he is putting the final touches on his doctoral dissertation: “Kinamaadiwin Inaakonigewin: A Path to Anishinaabe Cultural Resurgence and Reconciliation”. His SSHRC funded doctoral research highlights a community-based approach to understanding the historical and contemporary conditions that shape the practices and meanings of Indigenous education, law, social justice and traditional knowledges. Leo also critically engages with anti-colonial theory, thinking through the complexity of socio-legal concepts such as reconciliation and decolonization in the contexts of local Indigenous communities (in particular, the Anishinaabe Nation in Treaty # 3, Northwest Ontario) and in Canada more generally.

More...

Leo Baskatawang is an Anishinaabe scholar from Lac Des Mille Lacs First Nation, who is an influential social activist, writer, as well as decorated combat veteran. Prior to beginning his academic career, Leo was enlisted in the United States Army as a member of the prestigious 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), at which time he completed two combat tours in support of the Global War On Terrorism and Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2012, Leo initiated an activist movement called March 4 Justice, in which he walked from Vancouver to Ottawa, protesting the ‘Indian Act’. Leo is currently in the process of completing his PhD in Native Studies at the University of Manitoba, where he is putting the final touches on his doctoral dissertation: “Kinamaadiwin Inaakonigewin: A Path to Anishinaabe Cultural Resurgence and Reconciliation”. His SSHRC funded doctoral research highlights a community-based approach to understanding the historical and contemporary conditions that shape the practices and meanings of Indigenous education, law, social justice and traditional knowledges. Leo also critically engages with anti-colonial theory, thinking through the complexity of socio-legal concepts such as reconciliation and decolonization in the contexts of local Indigenous communities (in particular, the Anishinaabe Nation in Treaty # 3, Northwest Ontario) and in Canada more generally.