lmannik


Lynda Mannik

Department of Anthropology

Lecturer

Office: Founders 135
Email: lmannik@yorku.ca


Visual Anthropology; Communication and Media Studies; Photography; Memory; Discourses about Race; Refugee Identity, Global Movements and Politics; Nationalism and the politics of representation; Tourism;First Nations in Canada; Human Rights; Spectacle and Performance; ETHNOGRAPHIC AREAS: Canada; Estonia; Australia,

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Degrees

PhD Anthropology, York University
MA Canadian and Interdisciplinary Studies, Trent University
Honours BA History and Anthropology, Trent University

Research Interests

, Media , Immigration , Visual Anthropology, Refugee Studies, Methods and Methodologies
Books

Publication
Year

Practicing Ethnography: A Student Guide to Methods and Methodology. 2017 Edited by Lynda Mannik and Karen McGarry. University of Toronto Press.

2017

Migration by Boat: discourses of discrimination, trauma and survival (Editor). 2016. Berghahn Books.

2016

Reclaiming Canadian Bodies: visual media and representation. (co-editor with Karen McGarry) 2013. Wilfrid Laurier Press.

2013

Book Chapters

Publication
Year

“Arrivals by Boat in the Canadian Press: Humanitarian Effort or Crisis,” In Reclaiming Canadian Bodies: Representation and Visual Media, Lynda Mannik and Karen McGarry, eds., Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier Press.

"Memories of Forced Transformation through Travel in 1948,” In Travel and Transformation, eds. Garth Lean, Russell Staiff and Emma Waterton. Ashgate Publishing.

"Mysterious Refugees: Social Drama Ensues,” In Migration by Boat: discourses of discrimination, trauma and survival, Eds. Lynda Mannik. Berghahn Books.

“Remembering, Forgetting and Feeling with Photographs,” In Image and Memory: Oral History and Photography, A. Freund and A. Thomson, eds. London: Palgrave Macmillan.


Monographs

Publication
Year

Photography, Memory and Refugee Identity: The Voyage of the S.S. Walnut, 1948. 2013. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

2013

Canadian Indian Cowboys in Australia: representation, rodeo, and the RCMP at the Royal Easter Show. 2006. University of Calgary Press.

2006

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

“Heterotopic Faces in Heterotopic Places: migration by boat on Google Images” Third Text. (in press 2018)

2018

“Remembering Arrivals of Refugees by Boat in a Canadian Context” In Memory Studies, Sage Publications, Vol. 6, No. 4, January 2014, pp. 76-91.

2014

"Writing Individual Journalists’ Memories into Collective Memory” Journalism Studies (Online June 19, 2014).

2014

“Public and Private Photographs of Refugees: The Problem of Representation,” In Visual Studies, Vol. 27, No.3, November 2012, Taylor & Francis Group.

2012

Approach to Teaching


2020 Online Courses
ANTH3040 The Anthropology of Digital Media and Visual Representation
This course is about anthropology and visual representations of culture, and cultural difference. It looks at a wide variety of visual media online, including art, photography, film, and specific digital technologies (such as video games and online museums), to explore the ways in which they shape both the perception of, and the experience of, cultural difference and identity. Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on the inherent power of digital images, and their ability to shape our own cultural experiences, to cast cultural and ethnic others in particular ways, and to act as a mode for producing and resisting stereotypes.
This course examines a wide range of readings, films, and online videos in an effort to move toward developing a theoretical framework for analyzing and reading visual images. It draws on sources from a variety of media formats that are available online. Of central concern are representations of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and “otherness.” Cultural anthropologists have a vested interest in analyses of visual representations for a variety of reasons, one being that visual images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs about various cultures. Having said that, they are also produced within a political economy that is affected by class and gender hierarchies, and therefore issues concerning power and social order are central.

ANTH 4220 The Cultures of the Web
This course focuses on the fact that ethnographers enter their “fields” and conduct research in conjunction with theoretical ideas about anthropology alongside histories of experience and practice. Cultural anthropologists do “ethnography” and produce “ethnographies” through fieldwork. This course will primarily focus on contemporary cultural anthropology by introducing you to “digital ethnography.” Issues related to ethnographic field methods have been hotly debated for many years. This class will allow you learn about some of these debates as well as the personal foibles and insights of other anthropologists who have entered the digital “field.”
In order to truly understand what it is like to be a cultural anthropologist, you need to “get your feet wet” – have the experience of doing fieldwork. In this course, you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in observation, participation, and interviews concerning specific research projects as you move through the practical and experiential aspects of a digital ethnography. You will map out and complete every stage required for a full-blown research project. You will spend time (online) with research participants and learn how to analyze accumulated data. Overall, you will have the opportunity to develop a tool kit of experiences and practice that will allow you to see what it is like to be a professional, qualitative researcher wh0 is producing a “digital ethnography.”

For more information email: lmannik@yorku.ca


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3040 6.0 A The Anthropology of Digital Media ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH4220 6.0 A The Cultures of the Web ONLN


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Summer 2021 AP/ANTH3040 6.0 A The Anthropology of Digital Media ONLN


Visual Anthropology; Communication and Media Studies; Photography; Memory; Discourses about Race; Refugee Identity, Global Movements and Politics; Nationalism and the politics of representation; Tourism;First Nations in Canada; Human Rights; Spectacle and Performance; ETHNOGRAPHIC AREAS: Canada; Estonia; Australia,

Degrees

PhD Anthropology, York University
MA Canadian and Interdisciplinary Studies, Trent University
Honours BA History and Anthropology, Trent University

Research Interests

, Media , Immigration , Visual Anthropology, Refugee Studies, Methods and Methodologies

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

“Arrivals by Boat in the Canadian Press: Humanitarian Effort or Crisis,” In Reclaiming Canadian Bodies: Representation and Visual Media, Lynda Mannik and Karen McGarry, eds., Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier Press.

"Memories of Forced Transformation through Travel in 1948,” In Travel and Transformation, eds. Garth Lean, Russell Staiff and Emma Waterton. Ashgate Publishing.

"Mysterious Refugees: Social Drama Ensues,” In Migration by Boat: discourses of discrimination, trauma and survival, Eds. Lynda Mannik. Berghahn Books.

“Remembering, Forgetting and Feeling with Photographs,” In Image and Memory: Oral History and Photography, A. Freund and A. Thomson, eds. London: Palgrave Macmillan.


Books

Publication
Year

Practicing Ethnography: A Student Guide to Methods and Methodology. 2017 Edited by Lynda Mannik and Karen McGarry. University of Toronto Press.

2017

Migration by Boat: discourses of discrimination, trauma and survival (Editor). 2016. Berghahn Books.

2016

Reclaiming Canadian Bodies: visual media and representation. (co-editor with Karen McGarry) 2013. Wilfrid Laurier Press.

2013

Monographs

Publication
Year

Photography, Memory and Refugee Identity: The Voyage of the S.S. Walnut, 1948. 2013. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.

2013

Canadian Indian Cowboys in Australia: representation, rodeo, and the RCMP at the Royal Easter Show. 2006. University of Calgary Press.

2006

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

“Heterotopic Faces in Heterotopic Places: migration by boat on Google Images” Third Text. (in press 2018)

2018

“Remembering Arrivals of Refugees by Boat in a Canadian Context” In Memory Studies, Sage Publications, Vol. 6, No. 4, January 2014, pp. 76-91.

2014

"Writing Individual Journalists’ Memories into Collective Memory” Journalism Studies (Online June 19, 2014).

2014

“Public and Private Photographs of Refugees: The Problem of Representation,” In Visual Studies, Vol. 27, No.3, November 2012, Taylor & Francis Group.

2012

Approach to Teaching


2020 Online Courses
ANTH3040 The Anthropology of Digital Media and Visual Representation
This course is about anthropology and visual representations of culture, and cultural difference. It looks at a wide variety of visual media online, including art, photography, film, and specific digital technologies (such as video games and online museums), to explore the ways in which they shape both the perception of, and the experience of, cultural difference and identity. Throughout the course, an emphasis is placed on the inherent power of digital images, and their ability to shape our own cultural experiences, to cast cultural and ethnic others in particular ways, and to act as a mode for producing and resisting stereotypes.
This course examines a wide range of readings, films, and online videos in an effort to move toward developing a theoretical framework for analyzing and reading visual images. It draws on sources from a variety of media formats that are available online. Of central concern are representations of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and “otherness.” Cultural anthropologists have a vested interest in analyses of visual representations for a variety of reasons, one being that visual images, as cultural productions, are steeped in the values, ideologies, and taken-for-granted beliefs about various cultures. Having said that, they are also produced within a political economy that is affected by class and gender hierarchies, and therefore issues concerning power and social order are central.

ANTH 4220 The Cultures of the Web
This course focuses on the fact that ethnographers enter their “fields” and conduct research in conjunction with theoretical ideas about anthropology alongside histories of experience and practice. Cultural anthropologists do “ethnography” and produce “ethnographies” through fieldwork. This course will primarily focus on contemporary cultural anthropology by introducing you to “digital ethnography.” Issues related to ethnographic field methods have been hotly debated for many years. This class will allow you learn about some of these debates as well as the personal foibles and insights of other anthropologists who have entered the digital “field.”
In order to truly understand what it is like to be a cultural anthropologist, you need to “get your feet wet” – have the experience of doing fieldwork. In this course, you will have the opportunity to immerse yourself in observation, participation, and interviews concerning specific research projects as you move through the practical and experiential aspects of a digital ethnography. You will map out and complete every stage required for a full-blown research project. You will spend time (online) with research participants and learn how to analyze accumulated data. Overall, you will have the opportunity to develop a tool kit of experiences and practice that will allow you to see what it is like to be a professional, qualitative researcher wh0 is producing a “digital ethnography.”

For more information email: lmannik@yorku.ca


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3040 6.0 A The Anthropology of Digital Media ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH4220 6.0 A The Cultures of the Web ONLN


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Summer 2021 AP/ANTH3040 6.0 A The Anthropology of Digital Media ONLN