lmdavids


Lisa Davidson

Photo of Lisa Davidson

Department of Anthropology

Assistant Professor

Email: lmdavids@yorku.ca


As a teaching-stream Assistant Professor and a scholar of migration, racialization, and multiculturalism, my focus is on the experiential learning of undergraduate students, especially the learning of first-year students, and to expose students to think about inclusion and diversity beyond celebratory perspectives. I bring course materials that emphasize a wide range of knowledges and contributions by racialized, Black, Indigenous, and LGBTQ2S scholars that attend to alternative forms of social and political belonging. As such, my pedagogy includes music, food, creative writing, art work, performances, and social media that engage the oral, aural, visual and tactile senses of students for affective learning. My goal is to intervene in passive learning activities that take place in isolation by encouraging problem-based understanding and to integrate community ways of sensual, experiential, and imaginative knowledge pathways with academic ‘cerebral’ knowledge

My current research project, All in God’s Time: Hope, Conviviality and Place-Making among Filipino Canadian Protestants, is a collaborative study with Filipino Christian communities in Toronto, Montreal, and Winnipeg. The focus of this project is the question of tolerance, specifically, I ask: “what does it mean to be tolerated?” This study elucidates how Filipinos in Protestant congregations are working to create and sustain a sense of place, community, and belonging and the kinds of programs they are developing to support political and spiritual connections within their own communities and with newly arrived immigrants, second and third-generation Canadian Filipinos, and mixed-race Filipinos. Pedagogically, this research will include undergraduate students as a method of teaching, for them to gain hands-on experience with community learning and a deeper understanding of decolonizing research methods and urban anthropology. Previously, my research with multiracial and socio-economically underprivileged Protestant churches in Toronto focused on the political and emotional work involved in sustaining unity and in growing multicultural Christian communities amidst the challenges of doing hospitality. I am co-editor (with Roland Sintos Coloma, Bonnie McElhinny, Ethel Tungohan and John Paul C. Catungal) and contributing author of Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility (University of Toronto Press, 2012).

More...

Degrees

PhD. Anthropology, University of Toronto
M.A. Anthropology (Collaborative Program in Asia Pacific Studies), University of Toronto
B.A. (Honours). Anthropology, University of British Columbia

Research Interests

Anthropology , Multiculturalism, Migration and Transnationalism, Christianity, Kinship, Citizenship
Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Davidson, Lisa. 2012. “(Res)sentiment and Practices of Hope: The Labours of Filipina Live-in Caregivers in Filipino Canadian Families”. In Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility. University of Toronto Press. Pp 142-60.

2012

McElhinny, Bonnie, Lisa Davidson and John Paul C. Catungal et al. 2012. “Specters of (In)visibility: Filipina/o Labour, Culture and Youth in Canada”. In Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility. University of Toronto Press. Pp 5-45.

2012

Approach to Teaching


ANTH 1140 6.0 What is to be Human? Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 2130 6.0 Anthropology Through the Visual: Images of Resistance/Irresistible Images
ANTH 3230 6.0 Women, Culture and Society


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3230 6.0 A Women, Culture and Society LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH2130 6.0 A Anthropology Through The Visual ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH1140 6.0 A What does it mean to be human? LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH2130 6.0 A Anthropology Through The Visual ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3230 6.0 A Women, Culture and Society LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH1140 6.0 A What does it mean to be human? LECT


As a teaching-stream Assistant Professor and a scholar of migration, racialization, and multiculturalism, my focus is on the experiential learning of undergraduate students, especially the learning of first-year students, and to expose students to think about inclusion and diversity beyond celebratory perspectives. I bring course materials that emphasize a wide range of knowledges and contributions by racialized, Black, Indigenous, and LGBTQ2S scholars that attend to alternative forms of social and political belonging. As such, my pedagogy includes music, food, creative writing, art work, performances, and social media that engage the oral, aural, visual and tactile senses of students for affective learning. My goal is to intervene in passive learning activities that take place in isolation by encouraging problem-based understanding and to integrate community ways of sensual, experiential, and imaginative knowledge pathways with academic ‘cerebral’ knowledge

My current research project, All in God’s Time: Hope, Conviviality and Place-Making among Filipino Canadian Protestants, is a collaborative study with Filipino Christian communities in Toronto, Montreal, and Winnipeg. The focus of this project is the question of tolerance, specifically, I ask: “what does it mean to be tolerated?” This study elucidates how Filipinos in Protestant congregations are working to create and sustain a sense of place, community, and belonging and the kinds of programs they are developing to support political and spiritual connections within their own communities and with newly arrived immigrants, second and third-generation Canadian Filipinos, and mixed-race Filipinos. Pedagogically, this research will include undergraduate students as a method of teaching, for them to gain hands-on experience with community learning and a deeper understanding of decolonizing research methods and urban anthropology. Previously, my research with multiracial and socio-economically underprivileged Protestant churches in Toronto focused on the political and emotional work involved in sustaining unity and in growing multicultural Christian communities amidst the challenges of doing hospitality. I am co-editor (with Roland Sintos Coloma, Bonnie McElhinny, Ethel Tungohan and John Paul C. Catungal) and contributing author of Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility (University of Toronto Press, 2012).

Degrees

PhD. Anthropology, University of Toronto
M.A. Anthropology (Collaborative Program in Asia Pacific Studies), University of Toronto
B.A. (Honours). Anthropology, University of British Columbia

Research Interests

Anthropology , Multiculturalism, Migration and Transnationalism, Christianity, Kinship, Citizenship

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Davidson, Lisa. 2012. “(Res)sentiment and Practices of Hope: The Labours of Filipina Live-in Caregivers in Filipino Canadian Families”. In Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility. University of Toronto Press. Pp 142-60.

2012

McElhinny, Bonnie, Lisa Davidson and John Paul C. Catungal et al. 2012. “Specters of (In)visibility: Filipina/o Labour, Culture and Youth in Canada”. In Filipinos in Canada: Disturbing Invisibility. University of Toronto Press. Pp 5-45.

2012

Approach to Teaching


ANTH 1140 6.0 What is to be Human? Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 2130 6.0 Anthropology Through the Visual: Images of Resistance/Irresistible Images
ANTH 3230 6.0 Women, Culture and Society


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3230 6.0 A Women, Culture and Society LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH2130 6.0 A Anthropology Through The Visual ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH1140 6.0 A What does it mean to be human? LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH2130 6.0 A Anthropology Through The Visual ONLN
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH3230 6.0 A Women, Culture and Society LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/ANTH1140 6.0 A What does it mean to be human? LECT