maitra


Sudeshna Maitra

Photo of Sudeshna Maitra

Department of Economics

Assistant Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1110
Phone: (416) 736-2100
Email: maitra@yorku.ca
Primary website: https://www.sudeshnamaitra.com/


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. I hold a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. My research interests are in development economics and health economics. My research often explores the economic processes that could be at work behind observed data.

More...

Degrees

PhD, Princeton University
M.S. (Quantitative Economics), Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
B.Sc., University of Calcutta

Research Interests

, development, health, gender, the economic processes at work behind observed data
Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Does Parental Education Protect Child Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In B. Basu, B.K. Chakrabarti, S.R. Chakravarty, and K. Gangopadhyay (Eds.) Econophysics & Economics of Games, Social Choices and Quantitative Techniques , (Springer, 2010), pp. 213-232

2009

Is Socioeconomic Status Protective of Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In K.P. Sujit (Ed.) Poverty, Health and Development , (New Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers, 2009), pp. 69-94

2008

Dowry and Bride Price.
Book Chapter in International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 2nd Edition, Gale Thompson, 2007.

2007

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Population Dynamics and Marriage Payments: An Analysis of the Long Run Equilibrium in India.
The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, 18(2), June 2018.

2018

Class Matters: Tracking Urban Inequality in Post-Liberalization India using a Durables-based Mixture Model.
Applied Economics Letters, 24(17), 1203-1207, October 2017.

2017

The Poor Get Poorer: Tracking Relative Poverty in India using a Durables-based Mixture Model.
Journal of Development Economics, 119, 110-120, 2016.

2016

Can patient self-management explain the health gradient? Goldman and Smith's "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?" (2002) revisited.
Social Science and Medicine , 70(6), March 2010, pp. 802-812
Abstract: In their much-cited paper, "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?", Goldman and Smith (2002) use samples of diabetic and HIV+ patients in the United States to conclude that disease self-management is an important explanation for the much-documented positive gradient in education and health outcomes. In this paper, I revisit their analysis and point to some fundamental difficulties in interpreting their results as conclusive evidence in favor of self-management. I also argue that for individuals for whom self-management might be expected to matter -i.e. populations of patients managing complex conditions - economic factors such as resource availability and insurance access might be a more important mechanism behind the gradient than medical compliance. The impact of self-management, though it might matter, is likely to be small.
[go to paper]

2010



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/ECON2350 3.0 O Intermediate Microeconomic Theory II LECT


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at York University. I hold a PhD in Economics from Princeton University. My research interests are in development economics and health economics. My research often explores the economic processes that could be at work behind observed data.

Degrees

PhD, Princeton University
M.S. (Quantitative Economics), Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata
B.Sc., University of Calcutta

Research Interests

, development, health, gender, the economic processes at work behind observed data

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Does Parental Education Protect Child Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In B. Basu, B.K. Chakrabarti, S.R. Chakravarty, and K. Gangopadhyay (Eds.) Econophysics & Economics of Games, Social Choices and Quantitative Techniques , (Springer, 2010), pp. 213-232

2009

Is Socioeconomic Status Protective of Health? Some Evidence from Rural Udaipur
In K.P. Sujit (Ed.) Poverty, Health and Development , (New Delhi: Commonwealth Publishers, 2009), pp. 69-94

2008

Dowry and Bride Price.
Book Chapter in International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 2nd Edition, Gale Thompson, 2007.

2007

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Population Dynamics and Marriage Payments: An Analysis of the Long Run Equilibrium in India.
The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, 18(2), June 2018.

2018

Class Matters: Tracking Urban Inequality in Post-Liberalization India using a Durables-based Mixture Model.
Applied Economics Letters, 24(17), 1203-1207, October 2017.

2017

The Poor Get Poorer: Tracking Relative Poverty in India using a Durables-based Mixture Model.
Journal of Development Economics, 119, 110-120, 2016.

2016

Can patient self-management explain the health gradient? Goldman and Smith's "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?" (2002) revisited.
Social Science and Medicine , 70(6), March 2010, pp. 802-812
Abstract: In their much-cited paper, "Can patient self-management help explain the SES health gradient?", Goldman and Smith (2002) use samples of diabetic and HIV+ patients in the United States to conclude that disease self-management is an important explanation for the much-documented positive gradient in education and health outcomes. In this paper, I revisit their analysis and point to some fundamental difficulties in interpreting their results as conclusive evidence in favor of self-management. I also argue that for individuals for whom self-management might be expected to matter -i.e. populations of patients managing complex conditions - economic factors such as resource availability and insurance access might be a more important mechanism behind the gradient than medical compliance. The impact of self-management, though it might matter, is likely to be small.
[go to paper]

2010



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/ECON2350 3.0 O Intermediate Microeconomic Theory II LECT