ncoulter


Natalie H. Coulter

Photo of Natalie H. Coulter

Department of Communication Studies

Associate Professor
Director, Institute for Research on Digital Literacies (formerly Learning) (IRDL) York University

Office: 714 Kaneff
Phone: (416) 736-2100 Ext: 88787
Email: ncoulter@yorku.ca
Primary website: Dr. Coulter's Website
Secondary website: Institute for Research on Digital Literacies

Media Requests Welcome
Accepting New Graduate Students


Natalie Coulter is Associate Professor and Director of the Institute for Digital Literacies (IRDL) at York University, Canada. Her research explores the promotional ecologies of children’s media and entertainment. She is co-editor of Youth Mediations and Affective Relations, with Susan Driver (2019, Palgrave Macmillan) and author of Tweening the Girl (2014, Peter Lang). She has been published in the Journal of Consumer Culture, Girlhood Studies and the Journal of Children and Media and is a founding member of the Association for Research on the Cultures of Young People (ARCYP).

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Degrees

Ph.D. Communications, Simon Fraser University
M.A. History, University of Guelph
B.A. (Honours) in Anthropology and History, Trent University

Professional Leadership

Director, Institute for Research on Digital Learning (IRDL) (2019-Ongoing), York University.
Steering Committee Member, Toronto Film and Media Seminar (2018 – Ongoing).
Co-Chair YUFA Community Projects Committee (2014 – 2016), York University.
Senate Appeals Committee (2015-2018), York University.
Experiential Learning Committee, Research and Evaluation Working Group (2012-2014), York University
Founding Member and Executive Member (2007- 2011, 2012 – 2013), Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCYP).

Community Contributions

I am the Director of the Institute for the IRDL, at York University. I am currently completing a SSHRC funded research project entitled, The Embodied Tween: Living Girlhood in Global and Digital Spaces, where we ran arts-based research workshops with tween girls to explore their lived experiences as girls in mediated and digital spaces. The weekly workshops, dubbed “girls club”, culminated with two projects, each girl producing a short (2-3 minute) video documentary reflecting their own lives and each girl designing and creating a t-shirt that articulates messages about girlhood.

Research Interests

Communications , Children and Youth, Digital Literacies , Consumer Culture, Gender and Communications, Critical Technology Studies

Current Research Projects

Evangelisms, Entanglements and Superfans: Young People’s Creative Labour in the Visibility Economy

    Summary:

    The goal of this project is to explore how young people’s creative labour (both online and offline) is becoming entangled with the promotional activities of children’s media and entertainment industry. This project will seek wider clarity on the commercial epistemologies that ideologically define childhood through the logics of marketplace, the immaterial labour of young people’s fandom, and the fetishization of authenticity in the visibility economy.

    Description:

    My project seeks to rectify these oversights by exploring
    (a) how children’s media and entertainment companies harness young people’s creative labour to promote intellectual properties
    (b) the implications of this on how we define young people’s labour within digital capitalism.

    See more
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Sep   Year: 2019

    End Date:
      Month: May   Year: 2022

    Funders:
    SSHRC, IDG
Ethical, Accessible Research Data Management for the Jane Finch Community

    Summary:

    The Jane Finch Community Research Partnership (JFCRP) is a collaborative endeavor between York university and community members of the Jane Finch Community. The goal is to produce the Community Research Portal called Jane Finch Collections (JFC) that can be accessed by the Jane Finch community. https://janefinchresearch.ca/

    Description:

    For at least ten years, residents of the Jane Finch (JF) community in northwest Toronto have made concerted efforts to influence and gain access to the wide array of academic research that is conducted on and about their community (as opposed to with their community). This project aims to provide support in accessing this research, and in doing so, create new ways for community members to fight the stigmatization of their community by outside researchers (intentional or not), and allow community members to take leading roles in building more productive, ethical, informed and respectful relationships between academic researchers and local community members and organizations.

    See more
    Role: Collaborator

    Funders:
    SSRHC Connections: Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative
Global Girlhoods: From Imaginings to Embodied Experiences

    Summary:

    A symposium that seeks to reposition, relocate, and reframe girls within the context of both girl and child studies by asking: How do we delineate the boundaries of girlhood? Which girls are visible and which are invisible in these boundaries? What are the everyday practices of actual girls that work to challenge these narrow definitions and representations? How do girls themselves negotiate, engage, take up, resist, or reassemble the cultural frames of girlhood offered to them? What do girls’ responses reveal about this contemporary moment of girlhood?

    See more
    Role: Principle Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2019

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2020

    Funders:
    SSHRC Connections
Embodying the Tween: Living Girlhood in Global and Digital Spaces

    Summary:

    The purpose of this project is to explore the tensions between the commercial constructions of youth cultures and the lived experiences of the embodied young person. It will address how the tween girl is framed by and how she engages with such framings. This research has two foci. The first is an exploration of how the cultural industries of girlhood, including digital media and global transmedia properties contribute to the synergistic forces of global capitalism to produce the tween as a global assemblage. The sites of this research include online advergames such as Moshi Monsters and Movie Star Planet, and the websites of media companies such as Disney and Nickelodeon, and digital market research companies such as KZero. The second foci is to explore what girls do with the tween cultures that are produced for them but rarely by them by asking how they negotiate these resources of subjectivity in their everyday lives by looking at the immaterial labour of their participation in digital media and social media networks.

    Description:

    This is an important contribution to the field as it begins to fill a void in the fields of critical technology studies, media studies and girls’ studies. In the past decade academics in these fields have lamented the lack of scholarship on the use of media culture by young people and the role of media culture in the lives of young people (Buckingham 2000; Henteges 2000; Kearney 2011; Livingston 1998; Prout 2008;). This study will move beyond the work that is currently being done in the fields of critical technology studies, media studies and girls’ studies by exploring how girls engage with a construction of girlhood that dominates much of the transnational mediascape and meets the needs of the global marketplace. In doing so I will uncover some of the tensions between the commercial worlds of youth cultures and the lived experiences of the embodied young person.

    See more
    Role: Principle Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2013

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2016

    Funders:
    SSHRC
Young People’s Media Industries in Canada

    Summary:

    Canadian children’s and youth media has largely been ignored as a field of study in Canadian communication studies. The children’s and youth cultural industries in Canada are successful both nationally and globally. Scholarship in this area needs to be constitutively integrated into to scholarship on the Canadian mediascape, as does young people’s presence as active participants in Canadian media culture.

    Description:

    Canadian children’s and youth media has largely been ignored as a field of study in Canadian communication studies. The children’s and youth cultural industries in Canada are successful both nationally and globally. Scholarship in this area needs to be constitutively integrated into to scholarship on the Canadian mediascape, as does young people’s presence as active participants in Canadian media culture.

    See more
    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2012

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2016

Books

Publication
Year

M. Gasher, D. Skinner and N. Coulter. Mass Communication in Canada. 9th edition. Oxford University Press: Toronto.

2020

S. Driver and N. Coulter (eds). Youth Mediations and Affective Relations. Palgrave Macmillan: New York.

2018

Coulter, N. (2014) .Tweening the Girl: The Crystallization of the Tween Market. Mediated Youth Series, edited by Sharon Mazzarella. New York: Peter Lang.

2014

Book Chapters

Publication
Year

N. Coulter. The cultural, political and ethical mazes of childhood. Routledge Companion to Digital Media and Children. L. Green, D. Holloway, L. Haddon, K. Stevenson and T. Leaver (eds). Routledge: London.

2020

N. Coulter. Emergence of the Canadian Tween Market. Advertising, consumer culture & Canadian society. Kyle Asquith (ed). Oxford University Press: Toronto, ON. (pp. 71–87).

2018

N. Coulter. My Moshi Monster is 'Desolate.' Digital Games and Affect in Neoliberal Capitalism. Youth mediations and affective relations. S. Driver and N. Coulter (eds). Palgrave Macmillan: New York. (pp. 107-118).

2018

Coulter, N. (2013) . From the Top Drawer to the Bottom Line: The Commodification of Children’s Culture. Mediascapes. 4th edition. Leslie Regan Shade, editor, Nelson Education: Toronto. (pp. 409-426)

2013

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

N. Coulter and K. Moruzi. (2020). Woke Girls: From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue. Feminist Media Studies.

2020

N. Coulter. (2019) ‘Frappés, Friends and Fun.’ Affective labour and the cultural industries of girlhood. Journal of Consumer Culture.

2019

Coulter, N and M. Kennedy. (eds.) (2018). Special Issue: Locating the Tween Girl. Girlhood Studies 11.1.

2018

Coulter, N. (2016). More 'Missed Opportunities': The Oversight of Canadian Children’s Media. Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol 41.

2016

S. Poyntz, N. Coulter and G. Brisson. (2016) Past Tensions and Future Possibilities: ARCYP and Children's Media Studies. Journal of Children and Media. 10.1: 47- 53.

2016

Coulter, N., and H. Ramirez. (2015). Locked In: Feminist Perspectives on Surviving on Academic Piecework. New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry. 7 (4): 28-36.

2015

Coulter, N. (2014). Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places: Mythology of DWYL in the Neoliberal Marketplace of Academic Labour. English Studies in Canada. 40 (4): 13-16.

2014

Coulter, N. (2014). Selling the Male Consumer the Playboy Way. Popular Communication.

2014

Coulter, N. (2012). From Toddlers to Teens: Colonizing Childhood the Disney Way. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures. Summer issue. (146-158)

2012

Coulter, N. (2012). Separate Playgrounds: Surveying the Fields of Girls’ Media Studies and Boyhood Studies. Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol. 37(1): 353 – 363.

2012

Conference Papers

Publication
Year

Digital Entanglements in Digital Ecologies: Rethinking Children’s Creative Labour through a Child Studies Lens. Child and Teen Consumption Conference, Rutgers: New Jersey. (Postponed due to COVID-19.)

2020

with Tamar Faber. How is the digital child possible as such? Problematizing the child in digital capitalism and the visibility economy. Digitizing Early Childhood 2020, Milan, Italy. (Postponed due to COVID-19.)

2020

with Amina Ally and Grace Lao. Art-Based Research and Photo Voice to Explore Identity Politics. Canadian Communication Association. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, UBC, Vancouver, BC.

2019

Evangelisms, Entanglements and Superfans: Young People’s Creative Labour in the Visibility Economy. AoIR (Association of Internet Researchers). Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

2019

with Kris Moruzi. From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue: Girls’ periodicals and expressions of activism. Society for the History of Children and Youth, Sydney, Australia.

2019

The Creative Entanglements of Kidfluencers and Superfans. Youngsters Conference ARCYP, Toronto, ON.

2019

with Grace Lao and Amina Ally. The Elusive Girly Girl. Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes (WGSRF), Congress, UBC, Vancouver, BC.

2019

with Kris Moruzi. Woke Girls: From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue. International Girls Studies Association, Notre Dame, Indiana.

2019

Learning to Fail (and be rejected). Association for Research in the Cultures of Young People. ARCYP. Congress, Saskatoon, SK.

2018

Performing ‘authentic’ labour: The superfans, influencers and mirco-celebrities of children’s media culture. Children and Teen Consumption Group. Université de Poitiers, Poitiers, France.
Earlier versions presented at:
Digital Doings, York University (Toronto, ON) (2017)
ACRYP Research Symposium, Ryerson University (Toronto, ON) (2018)

2018

Pop goes the Girl: The production ecology of an intellectual property. Society for Cinema and Media Studies, Toronto, ON.

2018

with Anne MacLennan. Boxtop Citizenship: Children, consumer culture and radio. Society for the History of Children and Youth. Rutgers University, Camden: USA.

2017

The fun seeker, as the perfect neoliberal citizen. Marketing and Critique Conference, University of London, London, UK.

2017

When in doubt, laugh: Depoliticizing girlhood by privileging fun. Conceptualizing Children and Youth Conference. Brock University, St. Catherines, ON.

2017

#Think Happy #Be Happy: Affective labour and the cultural industries of girlhood. Youngsters Conference: ARCYP. Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC.

2016

'Fun is the new pretty’, and other such fables from the tween marketplace. Children and Teen Consumption Group. Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

2016

Do (tween) girls really just wanna have fun? International Girls Studies Conference. University of East Anglia. Norwich, UK.

2016

Happy girls are the prettiest: The politics of fun in rape culture. Moving Forward. Western University, London, ON.

2016

with Kerrie-Ann Bernard Belonging in the Act: Children in Canadian Broadcasting Policy. Society for the History of Children and Youth. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

2015

Girls, fashion and something called Justice.™ Canadian Communication Association. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.

2015

My Moshi Monster is “Desolate”: Digital Games and Affect in Neoliberal Capitalism. (October 2015) American Studies Association. Toronto, ON.

2015

Telling the Untold Story: Canada’s Role in the Children’s Television Industry. (July 2015). The Story of Children’s Television: An International Conference. Warwick, UK.

2015

Conference Proceedings

Publication
Year

Selling the in beTween: Commodifying Transformation and Transition. Peer Reviewed Conference Proceedings for Children and Teen Consumption.

2012

Research Reports

Publication
Year

Teaching at the Intersections: Community Engagement Projects: Engaging with the Jane Finch Community. Prepared for York University and YUFA. 10 pages.

2014

Public Lectures

Publication
Year

Invited Speaker with Tamar Faber. Influencers, Superfans and Microcelebrities: Are children labourers in the digital factory? York University Scholars Hub at Markham Public Library, York University, Toronto, ON. Invited by: Ben Jones, Office of Alumni, York University (cancelled due to COVID-19.)

2020

Invited Speaker at Messy Middle. Method Mondays: Participatory Acts. The Catalyst (Ryerson University). Invited by: Dr. Miranda Campbell, Assistant Professor FCAD

2020

Invited Speaker. "Hey you! Smile”: Girls, Affective Labour, and the Neoliberal Marketplace. Tema Barn, Linköpings University, Sweden.

2019

Invited Speaker. Creative Entanglements: Rethinking Girl’s Labour in the New Digital Economy. Children, Media and Culture Research Group. Department of media, cognition and communication, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

2019

Invited Speaker. My Moshi Monster is “Desolate”: Games and Affect in Digital Capitalism. Gender Studies Research Group, and MEDITi. Tallinna Ülikooli Meediainnovatsiooni ja Digikultuuri Tippkeskus / Tallinn University Centre of Excellence in Media Innovation and Digital Culture, Tallinn University, Estonia.

2019

Invited Speaker. The Coder, The Fan and The Fun One: Imagined Girls, Digital, Capitalism and Neoliberalism. New Frontier Series Graduate Seminar, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario. Invited by: Vice Principal Academic and Graduate Students.

2019

Invited Speaker. When in Doubt, Laugh: The Depoliticized Girl as the Perfect Neoliberal Citizen. Gender in Research Group, Aarhus University, Denmark.

2019

Invited Speaker. “Hey you! Smile”: Depoliticizing girlhood in the neoliberal marketplace. Deakin Gender and Sexuality Studies, Deakin University, Australia.

2019

Invited Speaker. Mining the Data: The Case of the Superfan. McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology, University of Toronto, Ontario.

2018

Invited Speaker. 'Happy girls are the prettiest’: Depoliticizing Tween Girls One T-Shirt at a Time. Media and Gender Research Group, University of Leicester, UK.

2017

Invited Speaker. The missing history of Canadian children’s media. Institut for Medier, Erkendelse og Formidling / Dept. of Media, Cognition, and Communication, Københavns Universitet / Copenhagen University, Denmark.

2016

Approach to Teaching


Professor Natalie Coulter teaches a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses. These include, Research Methodologies at the graduate level, a second year Media, Culture and Society course, and a third year courses on Advertising. She also teaches a fourth year course on Children, Media and Education, that is run as an Experiential Education course in which the students have to complete a community engagement project with community partners in the Jane/Finch community. As a professor, Dr. Coulter employs a wide range of teaching tools and styles. She firmly believes in the values of a liberal arts education and encourages her students to engage critically with the world around them. Dr. Coulter is currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the research areas of Girls' Studies, Children and Youth Studies, Digital Literacies , Consumer Culture, and Critical Technology Studies.



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/COMN3701 3.0 M Advertising, Culture and Society SEMR
Winter 2021 GS/CMCT7200 3.0 M Advanced Research Methodologies SEMR


Natalie Coulter is Associate Professor and Director of the Institute for Digital Literacies (IRDL) at York University, Canada. Her research explores the promotional ecologies of children’s media and entertainment. She is co-editor of Youth Mediations and Affective Relations, with Susan Driver (2019, Palgrave Macmillan) and author of Tweening the Girl (2014, Peter Lang). She has been published in the Journal of Consumer Culture, Girlhood Studies and the Journal of Children and Media and is a founding member of the Association for Research on the Cultures of Young People (ARCYP).

Degrees

Ph.D. Communications, Simon Fraser University
M.A. History, University of Guelph
B.A. (Honours) in Anthropology and History, Trent University

Professional Leadership

Director, Institute for Research on Digital Learning (IRDL) (2019-Ongoing), York University.
Steering Committee Member, Toronto Film and Media Seminar (2018 – Ongoing).
Co-Chair YUFA Community Projects Committee (2014 – 2016), York University.
Senate Appeals Committee (2015-2018), York University.
Experiential Learning Committee, Research and Evaluation Working Group (2012-2014), York University
Founding Member and Executive Member (2007- 2011, 2012 – 2013), Association for Research in Cultures of Young People (ARCYP).

Community Contributions

I am the Director of the Institute for the IRDL, at York University. I am currently completing a SSHRC funded research project entitled, The Embodied Tween: Living Girlhood in Global and Digital Spaces, where we ran arts-based research workshops with tween girls to explore their lived experiences as girls in mediated and digital spaces. The weekly workshops, dubbed “girls club”, culminated with two projects, each girl producing a short (2-3 minute) video documentary reflecting their own lives and each girl designing and creating a t-shirt that articulates messages about girlhood.

Research Interests

Communications , Children and Youth, Digital Literacies , Consumer Culture, Gender and Communications, Critical Technology Studies

Current Research Projects

Evangelisms, Entanglements and Superfans: Young People’s Creative Labour in the Visibility Economy

    Summary:

    The goal of this project is to explore how young people’s creative labour (both online and offline) is becoming entangled with the promotional activities of children’s media and entertainment industry. This project will seek wider clarity on the commercial epistemologies that ideologically define childhood through the logics of marketplace, the immaterial labour of young people’s fandom, and the fetishization of authenticity in the visibility economy.

    Description:

    My project seeks to rectify these oversights by exploring
    (a) how children’s media and entertainment companies harness young people’s creative labour to promote intellectual properties
    (b) the implications of this on how we define young people’s labour within digital capitalism.

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Principal Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Sep   Year: 2019

    End Date:
      Month: May   Year: 2022

    Funders:
    SSHRC, IDG
Ethical, Accessible Research Data Management for the Jane Finch Community

    Summary:

    The Jane Finch Community Research Partnership (JFCRP) is a collaborative endeavor between York university and community members of the Jane Finch Community. The goal is to produce the Community Research Portal called Jane Finch Collections (JFC) that can be accessed by the Jane Finch community. https://janefinchresearch.ca/

    Description:

    For at least ten years, residents of the Jane Finch (JF) community in northwest Toronto have made concerted efforts to influence and gain access to the wide array of academic research that is conducted on and about their community (as opposed to with their community). This project aims to provide support in accessing this research, and in doing so, create new ways for community members to fight the stigmatization of their community by outside researchers (intentional or not), and allow community members to take leading roles in building more productive, ethical, informed and respectful relationships between academic researchers and local community members and organizations.

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Collaborator

    Funders:
    SSRHC Connections: Research Data Management Capacity Building Initiative
Global Girlhoods: From Imaginings to Embodied Experiences

    Summary:

    A symposium that seeks to reposition, relocate, and reframe girls within the context of both girl and child studies by asking: How do we delineate the boundaries of girlhood? Which girls are visible and which are invisible in these boundaries? What are the everyday practices of actual girls that work to challenge these narrow definitions and representations? How do girls themselves negotiate, engage, take up, resist, or reassemble the cultural frames of girlhood offered to them? What do girls’ responses reveal about this contemporary moment of girlhood?

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Principle Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2019

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2020

    Funders:
    SSHRC Connections
Embodying the Tween: Living Girlhood in Global and Digital Spaces

    Summary:

    The purpose of this project is to explore the tensions between the commercial constructions of youth cultures and the lived experiences of the embodied young person. It will address how the tween girl is framed by and how she engages with such framings. This research has two foci. The first is an exploration of how the cultural industries of girlhood, including digital media and global transmedia properties contribute to the synergistic forces of global capitalism to produce the tween as a global assemblage. The sites of this research include online advergames such as Moshi Monsters and Movie Star Planet, and the websites of media companies such as Disney and Nickelodeon, and digital market research companies such as KZero. The second foci is to explore what girls do with the tween cultures that are produced for them but rarely by them by asking how they negotiate these resources of subjectivity in their everyday lives by looking at the immaterial labour of their participation in digital media and social media networks.

    Description:

    This is an important contribution to the field as it begins to fill a void in the fields of critical technology studies, media studies and girls’ studies. In the past decade academics in these fields have lamented the lack of scholarship on the use of media culture by young people and the role of media culture in the lives of young people (Buckingham 2000; Henteges 2000; Kearney 2011; Livingston 1998; Prout 2008;). This study will move beyond the work that is currently being done in the fields of critical technology studies, media studies and girls’ studies by exploring how girls engage with a construction of girlhood that dominates much of the transnational mediascape and meets the needs of the global marketplace. In doing so I will uncover some of the tensions between the commercial worlds of youth cultures and the lived experiences of the embodied young person.

    Project Type: Funded
    Role: Principle Investigator

    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2013

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2016

    Funders:
    SSHRC
Young People’s Media Industries in Canada

    Summary:

    Canadian children’s and youth media has largely been ignored as a field of study in Canadian communication studies. The children’s and youth cultural industries in Canada are successful both nationally and globally. Scholarship in this area needs to be constitutively integrated into to scholarship on the Canadian mediascape, as does young people’s presence as active participants in Canadian media culture.

    Description:

    Canadian children’s and youth media has largely been ignored as a field of study in Canadian communication studies. The children’s and youth cultural industries in Canada are successful both nationally and globally. Scholarship in this area needs to be constitutively integrated into to scholarship on the Canadian mediascape, as does young people’s presence as active participants in Canadian media culture.

    Project Type: Self-Funded
    Start Date:
      Month: Jan   Year: 2012

    End Date:
      Month: Dec   Year: 2016

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

N. Coulter. The cultural, political and ethical mazes of childhood. Routledge Companion to Digital Media and Children. L. Green, D. Holloway, L. Haddon, K. Stevenson and T. Leaver (eds). Routledge: London.

2020

N. Coulter. Emergence of the Canadian Tween Market. Advertising, consumer culture & Canadian society. Kyle Asquith (ed). Oxford University Press: Toronto, ON. (pp. 71–87).

2018

N. Coulter. My Moshi Monster is 'Desolate.' Digital Games and Affect in Neoliberal Capitalism. Youth mediations and affective relations. S. Driver and N. Coulter (eds). Palgrave Macmillan: New York. (pp. 107-118).

2018

Coulter, N. (2013) . From the Top Drawer to the Bottom Line: The Commodification of Children’s Culture. Mediascapes. 4th edition. Leslie Regan Shade, editor, Nelson Education: Toronto. (pp. 409-426)

2013

Books

Publication
Year

M. Gasher, D. Skinner and N. Coulter. Mass Communication in Canada. 9th edition. Oxford University Press: Toronto.

2020

S. Driver and N. Coulter (eds). Youth Mediations and Affective Relations. Palgrave Macmillan: New York.

2018

Coulter, N. (2014) .Tweening the Girl: The Crystallization of the Tween Market. Mediated Youth Series, edited by Sharon Mazzarella. New York: Peter Lang.

2014

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

N. Coulter and K. Moruzi. (2020). Woke Girls: From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue. Feminist Media Studies.

2020

N. Coulter. (2019) ‘Frappés, Friends and Fun.’ Affective labour and the cultural industries of girlhood. Journal of Consumer Culture.

2019

Coulter, N and M. Kennedy. (eds.) (2018). Special Issue: Locating the Tween Girl. Girlhood Studies 11.1.

2018

Coulter, N. (2016). More 'Missed Opportunities': The Oversight of Canadian Children’s Media. Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol 41.

2016

S. Poyntz, N. Coulter and G. Brisson. (2016) Past Tensions and Future Possibilities: ARCYP and Children's Media Studies. Journal of Children and Media. 10.1: 47- 53.

2016

Coulter, N., and H. Ramirez. (2015). Locked In: Feminist Perspectives on Surviving on Academic Piecework. New Proposals: Journal of Marxism and Interdisciplinary Inquiry. 7 (4): 28-36.

2015

Coulter, N. (2014). Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places: Mythology of DWYL in the Neoliberal Marketplace of Academic Labour. English Studies in Canada. 40 (4): 13-16.

2014

Coulter, N. (2014). Selling the Male Consumer the Playboy Way. Popular Communication.

2014

Coulter, N. (2012). From Toddlers to Teens: Colonizing Childhood the Disney Way. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures. Summer issue. (146-158)

2012

Coulter, N. (2012). Separate Playgrounds: Surveying the Fields of Girls’ Media Studies and Boyhood Studies. Canadian Journal of Communication. Vol. 37(1): 353 – 363.

2012

Conference Papers

Publication
Year

Digital Entanglements in Digital Ecologies: Rethinking Children’s Creative Labour through a Child Studies Lens. Child and Teen Consumption Conference, Rutgers: New Jersey. (Postponed due to COVID-19.)

2020

with Tamar Faber. How is the digital child possible as such? Problematizing the child in digital capitalism and the visibility economy. Digitizing Early Childhood 2020, Milan, Italy. (Postponed due to COVID-19.)

2020

with Amina Ally and Grace Lao. Art-Based Research and Photo Voice to Explore Identity Politics. Canadian Communication Association. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences, UBC, Vancouver, BC.

2019

Evangelisms, Entanglements and Superfans: Young People’s Creative Labour in the Visibility Economy. AoIR (Association of Internet Researchers). Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

2019

with Kris Moruzi. From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue: Girls’ periodicals and expressions of activism. Society for the History of Children and Youth, Sydney, Australia.

2019

The Creative Entanglements of Kidfluencers and Superfans. Youngsters Conference ARCYP, Toronto, ON.

2019

with Grace Lao and Amina Ally. The Elusive Girly Girl. Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes (WGSRF), Congress, UBC, Vancouver, BC.

2019

with Kris Moruzi. Woke Girls: From the Girl’s Realm to Teen Vogue. International Girls Studies Association, Notre Dame, Indiana.

2019

Learning to Fail (and be rejected). Association for Research in the Cultures of Young People. ARCYP. Congress, Saskatoon, SK.

2018

Performing ‘authentic’ labour: The superfans, influencers and mirco-celebrities of children’s media culture. Children and Teen Consumption Group. Université de Poitiers, Poitiers, France.
Earlier versions presented at:
Digital Doings, York University (Toronto, ON) (2017)
ACRYP Research Symposium, Ryerson University (Toronto, ON) (2018)

2018

Pop goes the Girl: The production ecology of an intellectual property. Society for Cinema and Media Studies, Toronto, ON.

2018

with Anne MacLennan. Boxtop Citizenship: Children, consumer culture and radio. Society for the History of Children and Youth. Rutgers University, Camden: USA.

2017

The fun seeker, as the perfect neoliberal citizen. Marketing and Critique Conference, University of London, London, UK.

2017

When in doubt, laugh: Depoliticizing girlhood by privileging fun. Conceptualizing Children and Youth Conference. Brock University, St. Catherines, ON.

2017

#Think Happy #Be Happy: Affective labour and the cultural industries of girlhood. Youngsters Conference: ARCYP. Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC.

2016

'Fun is the new pretty’, and other such fables from the tween marketplace. Children and Teen Consumption Group. Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

2016

Do (tween) girls really just wanna have fun? International Girls Studies Conference. University of East Anglia. Norwich, UK.

2016

Happy girls are the prettiest: The politics of fun in rape culture. Moving Forward. Western University, London, ON.

2016

with Kerrie-Ann Bernard Belonging in the Act: Children in Canadian Broadcasting Policy. Society for the History of Children and Youth. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

2015

Girls, fashion and something called Justice.™ Canadian Communication Association. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON.

2015

My Moshi Monster is “Desolate”: Digital Games and Affect in Neoliberal Capitalism. (October 2015) American Studies Association. Toronto, ON.

2015

Telling the Untold Story: Canada’s Role in the Children’s Television Industry. (July 2015). The Story of Children’s Television: An International Conference. Warwick, UK.

2015

Conference Proceedings

Publication
Year

Selling the in beTween: Commodifying Transformation and Transition. Peer Reviewed Conference Proceedings for Children and Teen Consumption.

2012

Research Reports

Publication
Year

Teaching at the Intersections: Community Engagement Projects: Engaging with the Jane Finch Community. Prepared for York University and YUFA. 10 pages.

2014

Public Lectures

Publication
Year

Invited Speaker with Tamar Faber. Influencers, Superfans and Microcelebrities: Are children labourers in the digital factory? York University Scholars Hub at Markham Public Library, York University, Toronto, ON. Invited by: Ben Jones, Office of Alumni, York University (cancelled due to COVID-19.)

2020

Invited Speaker at Messy Middle. Method Mondays: Participatory Acts. The Catalyst (Ryerson University). Invited by: Dr. Miranda Campbell, Assistant Professor FCAD

2020

Invited Speaker. "Hey you! Smile”: Girls, Affective Labour, and the Neoliberal Marketplace. Tema Barn, Linköpings University, Sweden.

2019

Invited Speaker. Creative Entanglements: Rethinking Girl’s Labour in the New Digital Economy. Children, Media and Culture Research Group. Department of media, cognition and communication, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

2019

Invited Speaker. My Moshi Monster is “Desolate”: Games and Affect in Digital Capitalism. Gender Studies Research Group, and MEDITi. Tallinna Ülikooli Meediainnovatsiooni ja Digikultuuri Tippkeskus / Tallinn University Centre of Excellence in Media Innovation and Digital Culture, Tallinn University, Estonia.

2019

Invited Speaker. The Coder, The Fan and The Fun One: Imagined Girls, Digital, Capitalism and Neoliberalism. New Frontier Series Graduate Seminar, University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario. Invited by: Vice Principal Academic and Graduate Students.

2019

Invited Speaker. When in Doubt, Laugh: The Depoliticized Girl as the Perfect Neoliberal Citizen. Gender in Research Group, Aarhus University, Denmark.

2019

Invited Speaker. “Hey you! Smile”: Depoliticizing girlhood in the neoliberal marketplace. Deakin Gender and Sexuality Studies, Deakin University, Australia.

2019

Invited Speaker. Mining the Data: The Case of the Superfan. McLuhan Centre for Culture and Technology, University of Toronto, Ontario.

2018

Invited Speaker. 'Happy girls are the prettiest’: Depoliticizing Tween Girls One T-Shirt at a Time. Media and Gender Research Group, University of Leicester, UK.

2017

Invited Speaker. The missing history of Canadian children’s media. Institut for Medier, Erkendelse og Formidling / Dept. of Media, Cognition, and Communication, Københavns Universitet / Copenhagen University, Denmark.

2016

Approach to Teaching


Professor Natalie Coulter teaches a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses. These include, Research Methodologies at the graduate level, a second year Media, Culture and Society course, and a third year courses on Advertising. She also teaches a fourth year course on Children, Media and Education, that is run as an Experiential Education course in which the students have to complete a community engagement project with community partners in the Jane/Finch community. As a professor, Dr. Coulter employs a wide range of teaching tools and styles. She firmly believes in the values of a liberal arts education and encourages her students to engage critically with the world around them. Dr. Coulter is currently accepting graduate students for supervision in the research areas of Girls' Studies, Children and Youth Studies, Digital Literacies , Consumer Culture, and Critical Technology Studies.



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/COMN3701 3.0 M Advertising, Culture and Society SEMR
Winter 2021 GS/CMCT7200 3.0 M Advanced Research Methodologies SEMR