ntusikov


Natasha Tusikov

Photo of Natasha Tusikov

Department of Social Science

Assistant Professor
Coordinator, Foundations Program

Office: 714A Ross Building South
Phone: 416 736 2100 Ext: 30158
Email: ntusikov@yorku.ca

Media Requests Welcome
Accepting New Graduate Students


Dr. Tusikov’s research examines the intersection among law, crime, technology, and regulation, and she is the author of Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet (University of California Press, 2017). She is a co-investigator on the SSHRC Insight Development Grant “Internet Governance, Intellectual Property and the Exercise of Power in the 21st Century” (2016-2020). She is the principal investigator of a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2018-2020) assessing data governance in smart cities with a focus on the proposed smart city development in Toronto. Her study on Internet firms’ sharing of personal information and the implications for Canadians’ privacy received funding from the Contributions Program at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (2016-2017). Before obtaining her PhD at the Australian National University, she was a strategic criminal intelligence analyst and researcher at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Ottawa.

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Degrees

PhD, Australian National University
MA, Queen's University
BA, University of British Columbia

Research Interests

Information Technologies , Crime, law and technology, Private security industry, Regulatory theory, Criminology

Current Research Projects

Governing Knowledge and Data in Smart Cities

    Summary:

    Natasha Tusikov is the principal investigator of a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2019-2021) entitled “Governing Knowledge and Data in Smart Cities,” in cooperation with Dr. Blayne Haggart and Dr. Nicole Goodman (Brock University), and Dr. Zachary Spicer (University of Western Ontario). This project investigates the central role that the control of data plays in smart cities. The project examines the interaction between state and non-state actors in regulating the creation and use of information within the knowledge-based economy. The project will assess the choices, practices, and norms that shape data collection, analysis, and use, the devices that capture data, and the relationships among government, private sector, and civil society in these processes.

    Description:

    Drawing on the smart city plan designed for Toronto’s Quayside neighbourhood and proposed by Sidewalk Labs, a subsidy of Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc. as a case study, the project will answer the following questions:
    How do the various actors understand the role of knowledge in the production, use and control over data?
    Who establishes the rules governing the collection, use and ownership of data?
    How does the collection and control of data affect public policy and government regulatory activities?
    What are the implications of the rules governing data on access to information, democratic decision making, and for social inclusion in the community?

    See more
Internet Governance, Intellectual Property and the Exercise of Power in the 21st Century

    Summary:

    This project explores the nature, limits and possibilities of global governance of what British International Political Economist Susan Strange (1994) calls the “knowledge structure,” that part of the political economy involving control over the production, control, and legitimization of knowledge. It focuses on two key and related aspects of the knowledge structure: internet governance; and intellectual property (IP) and data governance. In other words, our research focuses on the means by which information (in the colloquial sense) is communicated, and the means by which information is turned into economically and socially valuable commodities. While these issues are usually examined in isolation, in practice they are intimately related, with IP governing the content flowing over the network and internet governance setting the terms of access and use of the network itself.

    Description:

    This project investigates two key aspects of the regulation of knowledge creation and dissemination (what we call knowledge governance, or the knowledge structure): the heterogeneity of the state and non-state actors involved in this area (which actors are involved); and the scope of knowledge governance (the nature and effects of this governance). On the first aspect, the popularization and spread of the internet has had a dramatic effect on governance structures. Regarding the second aspect, the control of knowledge – intellectual property rights that allow for the appropriation of value in production, or the capture of personal data for the purposes of selling advertising or attempting to ensure state security – has become a (if not the) vector for political, social and economic power. This project has three main research questions:
    1. In terms of governance, which actors are shaping the rules that govern how knowledge is created, disseminated and used in a digital world?
    2. What are the social (economic, political, and creative) effects of these rules?
    3. What representational and distributional issues are posed by the specific forms of knowledge governance currently in place, and how can these challenges best be addressed?

    See more
Effects of Informal Online Regulatory Regimes on Privacy

    Summary:

    The goal of this project is to examine the potential effects on Canadians’ privacy of non-legally binding or ‘informal’ regulatory regimes that are undertaken by globally operating Internet firms and online payment providers. In particular, the project explores risks to Canadian’s privacy resulting from the involvement of Internet companies in informal regulatory agreements with intellectual property rights holders. The expansion of e-commerce facilitates the ability of consumers to acquire counterfeit goods and copyright infringing content such as unauthorised downloads of music, film, and software. To address this behaviour, multinational rights holders, such as Nike, Gucci, Proctor and Gamble, and Microsoft are forming enforcement partnerships with large, mostly U.S.-based Internet firms and payment providers like Google, PayPal and Visa. Instead of using legislation or judicial remedies like litigation or court orders, however, these rights holders are increasingly using non-legally binding regulatory agreements. These agreements, which do not have the force or legitimacy of law, are composed of broadly worded minimum guidelines to direct Internet firms’ enforcement efforts. Under these agreements, Internet firms and payment providers act voluntarily to remove Internet content from websites determined to be illicitly distributing counterfeit products or copyright-infringing material.

    Description:

    This project speaks to two of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner’s priorities, namely the business of collecting, using and disclosing information on the Internet, and analysis of companies’ codes of practice relating to privacy. The project’s objectives are to explore the following questions to assess how informal enforcement programs operating in Canada, the United States and European Union may affect Canadians’ privacy:
    1) What information from Canadians do intermediaries share with third parties in relation these informal agreements?
    2) What laws and policies govern intermediaries’ sharing of personal information with other corporate actors within these informal agreements, and to what extent are intermediaries compliant?

    See more
Books

Publication
Year

Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Natasha Tusikov, eds. (2019). Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

2019

Tusikov, N. (2017). Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet. Oakland, California: University of California Press.

2017

Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Tusikov, Natasha, Haggart, Blayne, and Kathryn Henne. (2019). Conclusion: Looking Back, Looking Forward. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 285-305.

2019

Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Natasha Tusikov. (2019). Introduction. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 1-22.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha. (2019). Precarious Ownership of the Internet of Things in the Age of Data. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 121-148.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha. (2017). Revenue Chokepoints: Global Regulation by Payment Intermediaries. In Luca Belli and Nicolo Zingales, eds. Platform Regulations: How They are Regulated and How They Regulate Us. Official Outcome of the United Nations Internet Governance Forum Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility. Internet Governance Forum. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Escola de Direito do Rio de Janeiro da Fundação Getulio Vargas http://bibliotecadigital.fgv.br/dspace/handle/10438/19402

2017

Tusikov, Natasha. (2017). Transnational Non-State Regulatory Regimes. In Peter Drahos, ed. Regulatory Theory: Foundations and Applications. Canberra: Australian National University Press.

2017

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Tusikov, Natasha. (2019). Defunding Hate: PayPal’s Regulation of Hate Groups. Surveillance & Society 17 (1/2): 46-53.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha (2019). How US-made rules shape internet governance in China. Internet Policy Review. 8(2). DOI: 10.14763/2019.2.1408

2019

Tusikov, N. (2019). Regulation through “bricking”: private ordering in the “Internet of Things”. Internet Policy Review, 8(2). DOI: 10.14763/2019.2.1405

2019


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC2653 6.0 A Research Methods in Criminology LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC4665 6.0 A Internet and Digital Crime SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC2653 6.0 A Research Methods in Criminology LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC4665 6.0 A Internet and Digital Crime SEMR


Dr. Tusikov’s research examines the intersection among law, crime, technology, and regulation, and she is the author of Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet (University of California Press, 2017). She is a co-investigator on the SSHRC Insight Development Grant “Internet Governance, Intellectual Property and the Exercise of Power in the 21st Century” (2016-2020). She is the principal investigator of a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2018-2020) assessing data governance in smart cities with a focus on the proposed smart city development in Toronto. Her study on Internet firms’ sharing of personal information and the implications for Canadians’ privacy received funding from the Contributions Program at the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (2016-2017). Before obtaining her PhD at the Australian National University, she was a strategic criminal intelligence analyst and researcher at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Ottawa.

Degrees

PhD, Australian National University
MA, Queen's University
BA, University of British Columbia

Research Interests

Information Technologies , Crime, law and technology, Private security industry, Regulatory theory, Criminology

Current Research Projects

Governing Knowledge and Data in Smart Cities

    Summary:

    Natasha Tusikov is the principal investigator of a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2019-2021) entitled “Governing Knowledge and Data in Smart Cities,” in cooperation with Dr. Blayne Haggart and Dr. Nicole Goodman (Brock University), and Dr. Zachary Spicer (University of Western Ontario). This project investigates the central role that the control of data plays in smart cities. The project examines the interaction between state and non-state actors in regulating the creation and use of information within the knowledge-based economy. The project will assess the choices, practices, and norms that shape data collection, analysis, and use, the devices that capture data, and the relationships among government, private sector, and civil society in these processes.

    Description:

    Drawing on the smart city plan designed for Toronto’s Quayside neighbourhood and proposed by Sidewalk Labs, a subsidy of Google’s parent company, Alphabet Inc. as a case study, the project will answer the following questions:
    How do the various actors understand the role of knowledge in the production, use and control over data?
    Who establishes the rules governing the collection, use and ownership of data?
    How does the collection and control of data affect public policy and government regulatory activities?
    What are the implications of the rules governing data on access to information, democratic decision making, and for social inclusion in the community?

    Project Type: Funded
Internet Governance, Intellectual Property and the Exercise of Power in the 21st Century

    Summary:

    This project explores the nature, limits and possibilities of global governance of what British International Political Economist Susan Strange (1994) calls the “knowledge structure,” that part of the political economy involving control over the production, control, and legitimization of knowledge. It focuses on two key and related aspects of the knowledge structure: internet governance; and intellectual property (IP) and data governance. In other words, our research focuses on the means by which information (in the colloquial sense) is communicated, and the means by which information is turned into economically and socially valuable commodities. While these issues are usually examined in isolation, in practice they are intimately related, with IP governing the content flowing over the network and internet governance setting the terms of access and use of the network itself.

    Description:

    This project investigates two key aspects of the regulation of knowledge creation and dissemination (what we call knowledge governance, or the knowledge structure): the heterogeneity of the state and non-state actors involved in this area (which actors are involved); and the scope of knowledge governance (the nature and effects of this governance). On the first aspect, the popularization and spread of the internet has had a dramatic effect on governance structures. Regarding the second aspect, the control of knowledge – intellectual property rights that allow for the appropriation of value in production, or the capture of personal data for the purposes of selling advertising or attempting to ensure state security – has become a (if not the) vector for political, social and economic power. This project has three main research questions:
    1. In terms of governance, which actors are shaping the rules that govern how knowledge is created, disseminated and used in a digital world?
    2. What are the social (economic, political, and creative) effects of these rules?
    3. What representational and distributional issues are posed by the specific forms of knowledge governance currently in place, and how can these challenges best be addressed?

    Project Type: Funded
Effects of Informal Online Regulatory Regimes on Privacy

    Summary:

    The goal of this project is to examine the potential effects on Canadians’ privacy of non-legally binding or ‘informal’ regulatory regimes that are undertaken by globally operating Internet firms and online payment providers. In particular, the project explores risks to Canadian’s privacy resulting from the involvement of Internet companies in informal regulatory agreements with intellectual property rights holders. The expansion of e-commerce facilitates the ability of consumers to acquire counterfeit goods and copyright infringing content such as unauthorised downloads of music, film, and software. To address this behaviour, multinational rights holders, such as Nike, Gucci, Proctor and Gamble, and Microsoft are forming enforcement partnerships with large, mostly U.S.-based Internet firms and payment providers like Google, PayPal and Visa. Instead of using legislation or judicial remedies like litigation or court orders, however, these rights holders are increasingly using non-legally binding regulatory agreements. These agreements, which do not have the force or legitimacy of law, are composed of broadly worded minimum guidelines to direct Internet firms’ enforcement efforts. Under these agreements, Internet firms and payment providers act voluntarily to remove Internet content from websites determined to be illicitly distributing counterfeit products or copyright-infringing material.

    Description:

    This project speaks to two of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner’s priorities, namely the business of collecting, using and disclosing information on the Internet, and analysis of companies’ codes of practice relating to privacy. The project’s objectives are to explore the following questions to assess how informal enforcement programs operating in Canada, the United States and European Union may affect Canadians’ privacy:
    1) What information from Canadians do intermediaries share with third parties in relation these informal agreements?
    2) What laws and policies govern intermediaries’ sharing of personal information with other corporate actors within these informal agreements, and to what extent are intermediaries compliant?

    Project Type: Funded

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

Tusikov, Natasha, Haggart, Blayne, and Kathryn Henne. (2019). Conclusion: Looking Back, Looking Forward. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 285-305.

2019

Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Natasha Tusikov. (2019). Introduction. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. 1-22.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha. (2019). Precarious Ownership of the Internet of Things in the Age of Data. In Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Tusikov, N., eds. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 121-148.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha. (2017). Revenue Chokepoints: Global Regulation by Payment Intermediaries. In Luca Belli and Nicolo Zingales, eds. Platform Regulations: How They are Regulated and How They Regulate Us. Official Outcome of the United Nations Internet Governance Forum Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility. Internet Governance Forum. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Escola de Direito do Rio de Janeiro da Fundação Getulio Vargas http://bibliotecadigital.fgv.br/dspace/handle/10438/19402

2017

Tusikov, Natasha. (2017). Transnational Non-State Regulatory Regimes. In Peter Drahos, ed. Regulatory Theory: Foundations and Applications. Canberra: Australian National University Press.

2017

Books

Publication
Year

Haggart, Blayne, Henne, Kathryn, and Natasha Tusikov, eds. (2019). Information, Technology and Control in a Changing World: Understanding Power Structures in the 21st Century. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

2019

Tusikov, N. (2017). Chokepoints: Global Private Regulation on the Internet. Oakland, California: University of California Press.

2017

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

Tusikov, Natasha. (2019). Defunding Hate: PayPal’s Regulation of Hate Groups. Surveillance & Society 17 (1/2): 46-53.

2019

Tusikov, Natasha (2019). How US-made rules shape internet governance in China. Internet Policy Review. 8(2). DOI: 10.14763/2019.2.1408

2019

Tusikov, N. (2019). Regulation through “bricking”: private ordering in the “Internet of Things”. Internet Policy Review, 8(2). DOI: 10.14763/2019.2.1405

2019


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC2653 6.0 A Research Methods in Criminology LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC4665 6.0 A Internet and Digital Crime SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC2653 6.0 A Research Methods in Criminology LECT
Fall/Winter 2020 AP/SOSC4665 6.0 A Internet and Digital Crime SEMR