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Akolisa Ufodike

Photo of Akolisa Ufodike

School of Administrative Studies

Assistant Professor

Email: ufo@yorku.ca

Media Requests Welcome
Accepting New Graduate Students


Dr. Akolisa Ufodike is an assistant professor in the School of Administrative Studies where he will be teaching auditing. His research interests include accountability, actor networks, common pools, public sector finance and public-private partnerships. He is an ad hoc reviewer for JBE, AP, Chinese Management Journal, Sustainability, BAFA, AAA and CAAA. He is also a CPA case examiner and brand ambassador. Dr. Ufodike is a licensed public practitioner by the CPA. Prior to Academia, he spent 25 years as a finance executive with professional experience spanning telecoms, banking, oil and gas, utilities, and consumer packaged goods with organizations including Bell Canada and Molson Coors. He was co-founder and CFO for Jaguar Wireless, a participant in the 2007 Canadian wireless spectrum auction. His last role in industry was as CFO and COO of Corridor Communications Inc (CCI Wireless) one of Canada’s largest wireless ISP’s. A graduate of Haskayne’s PhD and Cornell’s MBA program, Dr. Ufodike is a Canadian FCPA, a US CPA, a UK FCCA and a Certified Fraud Examiner. He's also a Certified Director ICD.D by the Institute of Corporate Directors. Dr. Ufodike sits on the Provincial Audit Committee for Alberta, the board of the Canada Nigerian Chamber of Commerce and the Senate of the University of Calgary. He previously sat on the board of the Loyalist Group, a TSX Listed Company where he was also Chair of the Audit Committee. He has served on the board of several charities including, Peel Literacy Guild where he was treasurer and the Black Business and Professional Association. Dr. Ufodike has also previously served as treasurer for Scouts Canada (Chinook Council) and thereafter as the Chairman.

More...

Degrees

PhD, University of Calgary
FCPA,
FCCA,
CPA (OR, USA),
ICD.D,

Research Interests

Accounting , Management, Diversity & Inclusion , Political Economy, Public Policy, Public Sector Finance
Journal Articles

Publication
Year

This study investigates the roles of informal gatekeepers in the context of First Nations health care in Canada. While existing literature focuses on gatekeeping by professionals, such as corporate board members, auditors, general practitioners, and specialists, we present empirical evidence on the role of informal First Nations’ gatekeepers in a health care system. Gatekeepers engage with government and First Nations along a continuum of gatekeeping functions. Drawing on common pool theory, we use a case study to understand the gatekeepers’ roles. We identify First Nations gatekeepers’ roles to include health care program control, resource control, and eco-system control. We also find that these gatekeepers constitute a viable long-enduring common pool resource institution that can be useful for the federal government’s phased approach in transitioning health care governance to the First Nations.

2021

Purpose - This study adopts an institutional entrepreneurship perspective in the context of public–private partnerships to highlight the role of social actors in enacting institutional change in a complex organizational setting. By studying the actions of two prominent social actors, we argue that successful institutional change is the result of dynamic managerial activity supported by political clout, organizational authority, and the social positioning of actors.
Design/methodology - We conducted a field-based case study in a complex institutional and organizational setting in Alberta, Canada. We employed an institutional entrepreneurship perspective to identify and analyze the activities of two allied actors motivated to transform the institutional environment for public infrastructure delivery.
Findings - Our empirical study suggests that the implementation of institutional change is both individualistic and collaborative. Moreover, it is grounded in everyday organizational practices and activities and involves a coalition of allies invested in enacting lasting change in organizational practice(s), even when maintaining the status quo seems advantageous.
Originality/value - We critique the structural explanations that dominate the literature on public–private partnership implementation, which downplays the role of agency and minimizes its interplay with institutional logics in effecting institutional change. Rather, we demonstrate that, given the observed impact of social actors, public–private partnership adoption and implementation can be theorized as a social phenomenon

2021

Public–private partnerships (P3s) have continued to grow in importance both as an alternative infrastructure delivery model and a management practice in many jurisdictions and across institutional contexts. This study draws on the institutional work perspective to investigate the nature and form of micro-activities that interact to cement a policy through the examination of the implementation of P3s as a management practice. The study advances our understanding of how the micro-activities of governmental agents and actors affect the development, codification, and support structures of P3s. We adopt a multi-location, field-based case approach and a diversified institutional setting presented by P3-adopting regions in the United States. We deploy an institutional work perspective to identify the micro-activities that are undertaken as part of the P3 routinisation and acceptance process.

2021

Purpose: This study examines the role of accountability in the governance and delivery of healthcare to a First Nations community in Canada.
Design/Methodology: Drawing on actor network theory, this study explores the role of accountability in the formation and sustenance of a healthcare network, using the case study of a First Nations healthcare organization in Canada.
Findings: The study provides insights into how accountability helps to sustain a network of actors with divergent interests and a plurality of strategies. It finds that network accountability is the central mechanism that motivates the principal actors in the network to reconstitute themselves and converge around the purpose of strengthening governance. This study also finds evidence of accountability as a multidimensional construct that facilitates the sustenance of the federal government as the controlling actor in the network.
Practical Application: This study provides fresh empirical insights gained from a flesh-and-blood actual network that acknowledges the context of a marginalized group—namely, First Nations peoples. Furthermore, this study extends and presents a viable accountability model that can be adopted as the federal government enters into self-governance agreements with First Nations Peoples.
Originality: In contrast to the dominant literature on accountability, this study adopts the unique context of a marginalized group in a market-based developed economy—specifically, Canada.

2021

Ufodike, Akolisa, REVIVING AUSTERITY: POPULIST SUPPORT FOR UNPOPULAR ECONOMICS IN CANADA (October 28, 2020). Journal of Accounting, Ethics & Public Policy 21(4): 451-479 (2020)

2020

Other

Publication
Year

On Jan. 6, millions of people around the world witnessed a modern-era insurrection as it unfolded in the United States. Supporters of Donald Trump, the outgoing president, raided the Capitol in an attempt to prevent the certification of the November 2020 presidential election results.

2021

Corporate diversity targets could help dismantle systemic racism

2020

Do voters have an increasing tolerance for political misconduct or do they just have other electoral priorities?

2020



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2022 AP/ADMS4551 3.0 M Auditing and Other Assurance Services LECT
Winter 2022 AP/ADMS4551 3.0 O Auditing and Other Assurance Services LECT
Winter 2022 GS/MSMG6150 3.0 M Data Analytics f.Internal &Perfmnce Audt LECT


Dr. Akolisa Ufodike is an assistant professor in the School of Administrative Studies where he will be teaching auditing. His research interests include accountability, actor networks, common pools, public sector finance and public-private partnerships. He is an ad hoc reviewer for JBE, AP, Chinese Management Journal, Sustainability, BAFA, AAA and CAAA. He is also a CPA case examiner and brand ambassador. Dr. Ufodike is a licensed public practitioner by the CPA. Prior to Academia, he spent 25 years as a finance executive with professional experience spanning telecoms, banking, oil and gas, utilities, and consumer packaged goods with organizations including Bell Canada and Molson Coors. He was co-founder and CFO for Jaguar Wireless, a participant in the 2007 Canadian wireless spectrum auction. His last role in industry was as CFO and COO of Corridor Communications Inc (CCI Wireless) one of Canada’s largest wireless ISP’s. A graduate of Haskayne’s PhD and Cornell’s MBA program, Dr. Ufodike is a Canadian FCPA, a US CPA, a UK FCCA and a Certified Fraud Examiner. He's also a Certified Director ICD.D by the Institute of Corporate Directors. Dr. Ufodike sits on the Provincial Audit Committee for Alberta, the board of the Canada Nigerian Chamber of Commerce and the Senate of the University of Calgary. He previously sat on the board of the Loyalist Group, a TSX Listed Company where he was also Chair of the Audit Committee. He has served on the board of several charities including, Peel Literacy Guild where he was treasurer and the Black Business and Professional Association. Dr. Ufodike has also previously served as treasurer for Scouts Canada (Chinook Council) and thereafter as the Chairman.

Degrees

PhD, University of Calgary
FCPA,
FCCA,
CPA (OR, USA),
ICD.D,

Research Interests

Accounting , Management, Diversity & Inclusion , Political Economy, Public Policy, Public Sector Finance

All Publications


Journal Articles

Publication
Year

This study investigates the roles of informal gatekeepers in the context of First Nations health care in Canada. While existing literature focuses on gatekeeping by professionals, such as corporate board members, auditors, general practitioners, and specialists, we present empirical evidence on the role of informal First Nations’ gatekeepers in a health care system. Gatekeepers engage with government and First Nations along a continuum of gatekeeping functions. Drawing on common pool theory, we use a case study to understand the gatekeepers’ roles. We identify First Nations gatekeepers’ roles to include health care program control, resource control, and eco-system control. We also find that these gatekeepers constitute a viable long-enduring common pool resource institution that can be useful for the federal government’s phased approach in transitioning health care governance to the First Nations.

2021

Purpose - This study adopts an institutional entrepreneurship perspective in the context of public–private partnerships to highlight the role of social actors in enacting institutional change in a complex organizational setting. By studying the actions of two prominent social actors, we argue that successful institutional change is the result of dynamic managerial activity supported by political clout, organizational authority, and the social positioning of actors.
Design/methodology - We conducted a field-based case study in a complex institutional and organizational setting in Alberta, Canada. We employed an institutional entrepreneurship perspective to identify and analyze the activities of two allied actors motivated to transform the institutional environment for public infrastructure delivery.
Findings - Our empirical study suggests that the implementation of institutional change is both individualistic and collaborative. Moreover, it is grounded in everyday organizational practices and activities and involves a coalition of allies invested in enacting lasting change in organizational practice(s), even when maintaining the status quo seems advantageous.
Originality/value - We critique the structural explanations that dominate the literature on public–private partnership implementation, which downplays the role of agency and minimizes its interplay with institutional logics in effecting institutional change. Rather, we demonstrate that, given the observed impact of social actors, public–private partnership adoption and implementation can be theorized as a social phenomenon

2021

Public–private partnerships (P3s) have continued to grow in importance both as an alternative infrastructure delivery model and a management practice in many jurisdictions and across institutional contexts. This study draws on the institutional work perspective to investigate the nature and form of micro-activities that interact to cement a policy through the examination of the implementation of P3s as a management practice. The study advances our understanding of how the micro-activities of governmental agents and actors affect the development, codification, and support structures of P3s. We adopt a multi-location, field-based case approach and a diversified institutional setting presented by P3-adopting regions in the United States. We deploy an institutional work perspective to identify the micro-activities that are undertaken as part of the P3 routinisation and acceptance process.

2021

Purpose: This study examines the role of accountability in the governance and delivery of healthcare to a First Nations community in Canada.
Design/Methodology: Drawing on actor network theory, this study explores the role of accountability in the formation and sustenance of a healthcare network, using the case study of a First Nations healthcare organization in Canada.
Findings: The study provides insights into how accountability helps to sustain a network of actors with divergent interests and a plurality of strategies. It finds that network accountability is the central mechanism that motivates the principal actors in the network to reconstitute themselves and converge around the purpose of strengthening governance. This study also finds evidence of accountability as a multidimensional construct that facilitates the sustenance of the federal government as the controlling actor in the network.
Practical Application: This study provides fresh empirical insights gained from a flesh-and-blood actual network that acknowledges the context of a marginalized group—namely, First Nations peoples. Furthermore, this study extends and presents a viable accountability model that can be adopted as the federal government enters into self-governance agreements with First Nations Peoples.
Originality: In contrast to the dominant literature on accountability, this study adopts the unique context of a marginalized group in a market-based developed economy—specifically, Canada.

2021

Ufodike, Akolisa, REVIVING AUSTERITY: POPULIST SUPPORT FOR UNPOPULAR ECONOMICS IN CANADA (October 28, 2020). Journal of Accounting, Ethics & Public Policy 21(4): 451-479 (2020)

2020

Other

Publication
Year

On Jan. 6, millions of people around the world witnessed a modern-era insurrection as it unfolded in the United States. Supporters of Donald Trump, the outgoing president, raided the Capitol in an attempt to prevent the certification of the November 2020 presidential election results.

2021

Corporate diversity targets could help dismantle systemic racism

2020

Do voters have an increasing tolerance for political misconduct or do they just have other electoral priorities?

2020



Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2022 AP/ADMS4551 3.0 M Auditing and Other Assurance Services LECT
Winter 2022 AP/ADMS4551 3.0 O Auditing and Other Assurance Services LECT
Winter 2022 GS/MSMG6150 3.0 M Data Analytics f.Internal &Perfmnce Audt LECT