avicohen


Avi J Cohen

Photo of Avi J Cohen

Department of Economics

Professor
University Professor

Office: Vari Hall, 1072
Phone: 647 376-7303
Email: avicohen@yorku.ca
Primary website: http://economicsforlife.ca
Secondary website: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Avi_Cohen3
Attached CV: https://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/files/Cohen_CV_May2020.pdf


Avi J. Cohen is University Professor of Economics at York University and at the University of Toronto. He has a PhD in Economics from Stanford University; a BA in Economics from the University of Michigan; is a Life Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge; is past President of the History of Economics Society; and a former Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University. His research interests are in the history of economics, economic education, and economic history. He has published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Economic Education, History of Political Economy, Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge Journal of Economics, Journal of Economic History, and Explorations in Economic History, among other journals and books.

He was a pioneer in integration of writing into Economics courses. A 1991 AEA-commissioned report on “The Status and Prospects of the Economics Major” (Siegfried et al. 1991) introduced the importance for Economics of the Writing Across the Curriculum movement. The Journal of Economic Education followed with a 1993 mini-symposium on writing, which included his first collaboration with a writing instructor (Cohen and Spencer 1993). A recent collaboration, integrating abstract and op-ed writing assignments into a face-to-face principles course with 500 students, and an online course with 400 students, also appears in the JEE (Cohen and Williams 2019).

He is a long-time creator of educational materials, starting in 1992 and continuing through eight editions of Study Guides for the Parkin and Bade introductory Economics textbooks. His Micro/Macro Economics for Life textbooks are entering their third edition in Canada. He has also written Micro and Macro FlexTexts: concise, print-only, classroom resources — “Coles Notes with knowledge checks, practice problems, and applications for employability skills” — for the Canadian post-secondary market.

Avi was an early adopter of technologies. After a 2003 visit to the University of Central Florida (award-winning pioneers in online and blended learning) he created a UCF-like 10-week faculty development course called do TEL (Technology Enhanced Learning), training instructors interested in transforming traditional courses into blended and online formats.

Professor Cohen is the winner of numerous teaching awards, including the 3M Teaching Fellowship , Canada’s most prestigious national award for educational leadership.

More...

When people ask me what I do, I say, “I teach Economics.” While I am a full professor at two universities, a productive academic with an active research program (past president of the History of Economics Society) and honourable service commitments to my schools, my professional identity is largely tied to my teaching.

As a young assistant professor, the immortality of publishing articles in journals that would forever be in libraries was an important goal. But over time, I came to realize how few people would read those articles, let alone be affected by them. Most of my, and I suspect most professors', “academic footprint” on this earth will be through our students. Over a career, we teach tens of thousands students.

As economists and teachers, what do we want our lasting “economic footprint” to be? There is a wonderful old Saturday Night Live skit by Father Guido Sarducci called The Five Minute University. Watch it. His premise is to teach in five minutes what an average college or university graduate remembers five years after graduating. For economics, he states it’s the two words “supply and demand.” That’s it.

The serious question behind the skit, the one that motivates my textbooks, is “What do we really want our students to remember of what we teach them in an introductory economics class?”

The vast, vast majority of students in introductory economics never take another economics course. Economics for Life is designed to help those students learn what they need to know to be economically literate citizens. If we can teach students the fundamentals of thinking like an economist, they will be equipped to make smarter choices in their lives as consumers, as businesspeople, and as citizens evaluating policies proposed by politicians.

Degrees

PhD Economics, Stanford University
BA Economics, University of Michigan

Professional Leadership

Series Editor (with G.C. Harcourt, P. Kriesler, J. Toporowski), Palgrave Studies in the History of Economic Thought Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 – present

Professor of Economics (Status-Only), University of Toronto, 2014 –present

Co-Lead (with Susa Murtha), “The Development of a Sustainable, Quality e-Learning Program for the Faculties of Health and Liberal Arts & Professional Studies,” York University Academic Innovation Fund, 2011-2014, $500,000

Senior Research Fellow, Center for the History of Political Economy, Duke University, 2011

Chair, Department of Economics, York University, 1994-1997

Research Interests

Economics , HIstory of Economics, Economics Education, Economic History
Books

Publication
Year

Macroeconomics for Life: Smart Choices for All?, updated 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2019 [2015, 2010]).

2019

Macroeconomics FlexText, 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Canada, 2018).

2018

Microeconomics FlexText, 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Canada, 2018).

2018

Microeconomics for Life: Smart Choices for You, 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2009]).

2015

Study Guide, 8th edition (with H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 8th edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2012 [2009, 2006, 2003, 2000, 1997, 1994, 1991]).

2009

Capital Theory, Vols I-III, (co-edited with C. Bliss and G.C. Harcourt), in the series Critical Ideas in Economics (edited by K.D. Hoover and M. Blaug) (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

Economics Study Guide: European Edition (with D. Fry, H. King and M. Powell) to accompany Parkin, Powell and Matthews, Economics European Edition, 6th edition (Harlow, England: Addison-Wesley, 2005).

2005

Guide de l’étudiant (with Pierre Chapleau and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Microéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [1999, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Microeconomics].

2005

Guide de l’étudiant (with D. Sanga and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Macroéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [2000, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Macroeconomics].

2005

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 3rd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 3rd edition (Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley, 1997).

1997

Macroeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Macroeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997 [1996]).

1997

Microeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Microeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997 [1995]).

1997

Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy, (co-edited with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin) (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

1997

Book Chapters

Publication
Year

" How and Why to Teach the History of Economic Thought: Economics as Historically Produced Knowledge" (with R. Emmett) in K. McGoldrick and G. Hoyt (eds.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics , (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011), pp. 543-555.

2011

“Reswitching and Reversing in Capital Theory” (with G.C. Harcourt), in M. Blaug and P. Lloyd (eds.) Famous Figures and Diagrams in Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2010), pp. 191-8.

2010

“Cambridge Controversies in Growth Theory,” in D. A. Clarke (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Development Studies (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2006), pp. 27-32.

2006

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 1, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

“Introduction on Capital Theory Controversy: Scarcity, Production, Equilibrium and Time” (with G.C. Harcourt), in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005), Vol. I, pp. xxvii-lx.

2005

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in M. Rutherford (ed.) The Economic Mind in America: Essays in the History of American Economics (Perspectives on the History of Economic Thought) (London: Routledge, 1998).

1998

“Introduction” (with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin), in A. Cohen, H. Hagemann and J. Smithin (eds.) Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

1997

“Böhm-Bawerk’s Letters to J.B. Clark: A Pre-Cambridge Controversy in the Theory of Capital” (with H. Drost), in P. Arestis, G. Palma and M. Sawyer (eds.) Capital Controversy, Post Keynesian Economics and the History of Economic Theory: Essays in Honour of Geoff Harcourt Vol, 1 (London: Routledge, 1996).

1996

“Why Haven’t Textbooks Resolved Sraffa’s 1926 Complaints?: The Realism of U-Shaped Cost Curves and Dominance of Perfect Competition,” in N. Aslanbeigui and M. Naples (eds.) Rethinking Economic Principles: Critical Essays on Introductory Textbooks (Homewood, Ill.: Irwin, 1995).

1995

“Does Joan Robinson's Critique of Equilibrium Entail Theoretical Nihilism?" in G. Mongiovi and C. Ruhl (eds.), Macroeconomic Theory: Diversity and Convergence (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993).

1993

"Samuelson and the 93% Scarcity Theory of Value," in M. Baranzini and G. Harcourt (eds.), The Dynamics of the Wealth of Nations: Growth, Distribution and Structural Change, Essays in Honour of Luigi Pasinetti (London: Macmillan, 1993).

1993

"Introduction to the Symposium" and editorship of Review Symposium on Philip Mirowski's "More Heat than Light: Economics as Social Physics, Physics as Nature's Economics," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 77-82.

1992

Book Reviews

Publication
Year

R. Backhouse and K. Tribe, The History of Economics: A Course for Students and Teachers. History of Political Economy, August 2020, 52 (4), 797-799.

2020

Response to review of Capital Theory, by F. Petri, European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008 15(2), 388-91.

2008

J. Birner, The Cambridge Controversies in Capital Theory: A Study in the Logic of Theory Development, History of Political Economy, Winter 2005, 37(4), 755-6.

2005

H.D. Kurz (ed.), Critical Essays on Piero Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics, History of Political Economy, Spring 2003, 35(1), 164-166.

2003

N. Rosenberg, Schumpeter and the Endogeneity of Technology: Some American Perspectives, EH.NET, August 2003, http://eh.net/bookreviews/library/0661.shtml.

2003

J. Henry, The Making of Neoclassical Economics, History of Political Economy, Fall 1994, 26(3), 510-513.

1994

G. Hodgson and E. Screpanti (eds.), Rethinking Economics: Markets, Technology and Economic Evolution, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1993, 31(3), 1448-1449.

1993

E. R. Weintraub, Stabilizing Dynamics: Constructing Economic Knowledge, Journal of Economic History, December 1992, 52(4), 977-978.

1992

N. De Marchi (ed.), “The Popperian Legacy in Economics: Papers Presented at a Symposium in Amsterdam”, December 1985, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, December 1990, 19(4), 527-531.

1990

P. Deane, The State and the Economic System: An Introduction to the History of Political Economy, Journal of Economic History, March 1990, 50(1), 240-241.

1990

G.C. Harcourt, Controversies in Political Economy, Eastern Economic Journal, January - March 1988, 14(1), 114-115.

1988

J.A. McGaw, Most Wonderful Machine: Mechanization and Social Change in Berkshire Paper Making, 1801 - 1885, Journal of Economic History, December 1987, 47(4),1044-1046.

1987

C.E. Twining, Phil Weyerhaeuser: Lumberman, Journal of Economic History, Dec. 1986, 46(4), 1098-9.

1986

D.L. Boese, Papermakers: The Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Journal of Forest History, January 1986, 30(1), 44-45.

1986

J. Pen, Among Economists: Reflections of a Neo-classical Post Keynesian, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1986, 24(3), 1218-1219.

1986

J. Elster, Explaining Technical Change, Journal of Economic Issues, March 1985, 19(1), 263-265.

1985

J.J. Klant, The Rules of the Game: The Logical Structure of Economic Theories, Journal of Economic Literature, December 1985, 23(4), 1788-1789.

1985

Professional Journal Articles

Publication
Year

"A Pareto-Improving Way to Teach Principles of Economics: Evidence from the University of Toronto" (with D. Benjamin and G. Hamilton), AEA Papers and Proceedings, 110 (May): 299-303

2020

“Scalable, Scaffolded Writing Assignments with Online Peer Review in a Large Introductory Economics Course” (with A. Williams), Journal of Economic Education, 50(4), 371-387.

2019

“Veblen Contra Clark and Fisher: Veblen-Robinson-Harcourt Lineages in Capital Controversies and Beyond,” Cambridge Journal of Economics, November 2014, 38(6), 1493-1515.

2014

“Capital Controversy from Böhm-Bawerk to Bliss: Badly Posed or Very Deep Questions? or What ‘We’ Can Learn from Capital Controversy Even If You Don’t Care Who Won,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2010, 32(1), 1-21 (lead article).

2010

"The Mythology of Capital or of Static Equilibrium?: The Böhm-Bawerk/Clark Controversy,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008, 30(2), 151-71 (lead article).

2008

“The Kaldor/Knight Controversy: Is Capital A Distinct and Quantifiable Factor of Production?” European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2006, 13(1), 141-161.

2006

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251. Reprinted in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 3, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

“Cambridge Capital Controversies – Comments and Response” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Fall 2003, 17(4), 227-233.

2003

“The Hayek/Knight Capital Controversy: The Irrelevance of Roundaboutness, or Purging Processes in Time?” History of Political Economy, Fall 2003, 35(3), 469-490.

2003

“Whatever Happened to the Cambridge Capital Controversies?” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 2003, 17(1), 199-214.

2003

“Using Writing Across the Curriculum in Economics: Is Taking the Plunge Worth It?” (with J. Spencer), Journal of Economic Education, Summer 1993, 24(3), 219-230.

1993

"What Was Abandoned Following the Cambridge Capital Controversies?: Samuelson, Substance, Scarcity and Value," History of Political Economy, Annual Supplement 1993, 25(5), 202-219.

1993

“Seeing the Light Despite the Heat: Post-Mirowski History of Economic Thought," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 83-96.

1992

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251.

1989

"Factor Substitution and Induced Innovation in North American Kraft Pulping: 1914-1940,” Explorations in Economic History, April 1987, 24(2), 197-217.

1987

"Issues in the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1985, 7(4), 612-615.

1985

“Technological Change as Historical Process: The Case of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry, 1915 - 1940," Journal of Economic History, September 1984, 44(3), 775-799.

1984

“The Methodological Resolution of the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1984, 6(4), 614-629.

1984

"Classical and Neoclassical Theories of General Equilibrium" (with J. Cohen), Australian Economic Papers , 22(40), June 1983, pp. 180-200.

1983

"The Laws of Returns Under Competitive Conditions: Progress in Microeconomics Since Sraffa (1926)?" Eastern Economic Journal, July-September 1983, 9(3), 213-220. Reprinted in M. Blaug (ed.), Pioneers in Economics: Vol. 44 Piero Sraffa (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1992).

1983

Other

Publication
Year

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 2nd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All?, 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2010]).

2015

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You , 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2009]).

2015


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2020 AP/ECON1000 3.0 A Introduction to Microeconomics LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/ECON1010 3.0 H Introduction to Macroeconomics BLEN


Avi J. Cohen is University Professor of Economics at York University and at the University of Toronto. He has a PhD in Economics from Stanford University; a BA in Economics from the University of Michigan; is a Life Fellow of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge; is past President of the History of Economics Society; and a former Senior Research Fellow at the Center for the History of Political Economy at Duke University. His research interests are in the history of economics, economic education, and economic history. He has published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Economic Education, History of Political Economy, Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge Journal of Economics, Journal of Economic History, and Explorations in Economic History, among other journals and books.

He was a pioneer in integration of writing into Economics courses. A 1991 AEA-commissioned report on “The Status and Prospects of the Economics Major” (Siegfried et al. 1991) introduced the importance for Economics of the Writing Across the Curriculum movement. The Journal of Economic Education followed with a 1993 mini-symposium on writing, which included his first collaboration with a writing instructor (Cohen and Spencer 1993). A recent collaboration, integrating abstract and op-ed writing assignments into a face-to-face principles course with 500 students, and an online course with 400 students, also appears in the JEE (Cohen and Williams 2019).

He is a long-time creator of educational materials, starting in 1992 and continuing through eight editions of Study Guides for the Parkin and Bade introductory Economics textbooks. His Micro/Macro Economics for Life textbooks are entering their third edition in Canada. He has also written Micro and Macro FlexTexts: concise, print-only, classroom resources — “Coles Notes with knowledge checks, practice problems, and applications for employability skills” — for the Canadian post-secondary market.

Avi was an early adopter of technologies. After a 2003 visit to the University of Central Florida (award-winning pioneers in online and blended learning) he created a UCF-like 10-week faculty development course called do TEL (Technology Enhanced Learning), training instructors interested in transforming traditional courses into blended and online formats.

Professor Cohen is the winner of numerous teaching awards, including the 3M Teaching Fellowship , Canada’s most prestigious national award for educational leadership.

When people ask me what I do, I say, “I teach Economics.” While I am a full professor at two universities, a productive academic with an active research program (past president of the History of Economics Society) and honourable service commitments to my schools, my professional identity is largely tied to my teaching.

As a young assistant professor, the immortality of publishing articles in journals that would forever be in libraries was an important goal. But over time, I came to realize how few people would read those articles, let alone be affected by them. Most of my, and I suspect most professors', “academic footprint” on this earth will be through our students. Over a career, we teach tens of thousands students.

As economists and teachers, what do we want our lasting “economic footprint” to be? There is a wonderful old Saturday Night Live skit by Father Guido Sarducci called The Five Minute University. Watch it. His premise is to teach in five minutes what an average college or university graduate remembers five years after graduating. For economics, he states it’s the two words “supply and demand.” That’s it.

The serious question behind the skit, the one that motivates my textbooks, is “What do we really want our students to remember of what we teach them in an introductory economics class?”

The vast, vast majority of students in introductory economics never take another economics course. Economics for Life is designed to help those students learn what they need to know to be economically literate citizens. If we can teach students the fundamentals of thinking like an economist, they will be equipped to make smarter choices in their lives as consumers, as businesspeople, and as citizens evaluating policies proposed by politicians.

Degrees

PhD Economics, Stanford University
BA Economics, University of Michigan

Professional Leadership

Series Editor (with G.C. Harcourt, P. Kriesler, J. Toporowski), Palgrave Studies in the History of Economic Thought Series, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 – present

Professor of Economics (Status-Only), University of Toronto, 2014 –present

Co-Lead (with Susa Murtha), “The Development of a Sustainable, Quality e-Learning Program for the Faculties of Health and Liberal Arts & Professional Studies,” York University Academic Innovation Fund, 2011-2014, $500,000

Senior Research Fellow, Center for the History of Political Economy, Duke University, 2011

Chair, Department of Economics, York University, 1994-1997

Research Interests

Economics , HIstory of Economics, Economics Education, Economic History

All Publications


Book Chapters

Publication
Year

" How and Why to Teach the History of Economic Thought: Economics as Historically Produced Knowledge" (with R. Emmett) in K. McGoldrick and G. Hoyt (eds.), International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics , (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2011), pp. 543-555.

2011

“Reswitching and Reversing in Capital Theory” (with G.C. Harcourt), in M. Blaug and P. Lloyd (eds.) Famous Figures and Diagrams in Economics (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2010), pp. 191-8.

2010

“Cambridge Controversies in Growth Theory,” in D. A. Clarke (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Development Studies (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2006), pp. 27-32.

2006

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 1, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

“Introduction on Capital Theory Controversy: Scarcity, Production, Equilibrium and Time” (with G.C. Harcourt), in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005), Vol. I, pp. xxvii-lx.

2005

“Frank Knight’s Position on Capital and Interest: Foundation of the Hayek/Knight/Kaldor Debate,” in M. Rutherford (ed.) The Economic Mind in America: Essays in the History of American Economics (Perspectives on the History of Economic Thought) (London: Routledge, 1998).

1998

“Introduction” (with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin), in A. Cohen, H. Hagemann and J. Smithin (eds.) Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

1997

“Böhm-Bawerk’s Letters to J.B. Clark: A Pre-Cambridge Controversy in the Theory of Capital” (with H. Drost), in P. Arestis, G. Palma and M. Sawyer (eds.) Capital Controversy, Post Keynesian Economics and the History of Economic Theory: Essays in Honour of Geoff Harcourt Vol, 1 (London: Routledge, 1996).

1996

“Why Haven’t Textbooks Resolved Sraffa’s 1926 Complaints?: The Realism of U-Shaped Cost Curves and Dominance of Perfect Competition,” in N. Aslanbeigui and M. Naples (eds.) Rethinking Economic Principles: Critical Essays on Introductory Textbooks (Homewood, Ill.: Irwin, 1995).

1995

“Does Joan Robinson's Critique of Equilibrium Entail Theoretical Nihilism?" in G. Mongiovi and C. Ruhl (eds.), Macroeconomic Theory: Diversity and Convergence (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993).

1993

"Samuelson and the 93% Scarcity Theory of Value," in M. Baranzini and G. Harcourt (eds.), The Dynamics of the Wealth of Nations: Growth, Distribution and Structural Change, Essays in Honour of Luigi Pasinetti (London: Macmillan, 1993).

1993

"Introduction to the Symposium" and editorship of Review Symposium on Philip Mirowski's "More Heat than Light: Economics as Social Physics, Physics as Nature's Economics," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 77-82.

1992

Book Reviews

Publication
Year

R. Backhouse and K. Tribe, The History of Economics: A Course for Students and Teachers. History of Political Economy, August 2020, 52 (4), 797-799.

2020

Response to review of Capital Theory, by F. Petri, European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008 15(2), 388-91.

2008

J. Birner, The Cambridge Controversies in Capital Theory: A Study in the Logic of Theory Development, History of Political Economy, Winter 2005, 37(4), 755-6.

2005

H.D. Kurz (ed.), Critical Essays on Piero Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics, History of Political Economy, Spring 2003, 35(1), 164-166.

2003

N. Rosenberg, Schumpeter and the Endogeneity of Technology: Some American Perspectives, EH.NET, August 2003, http://eh.net/bookreviews/library/0661.shtml.

2003

J. Henry, The Making of Neoclassical Economics, History of Political Economy, Fall 1994, 26(3), 510-513.

1994

G. Hodgson and E. Screpanti (eds.), Rethinking Economics: Markets, Technology and Economic Evolution, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1993, 31(3), 1448-1449.

1993

E. R. Weintraub, Stabilizing Dynamics: Constructing Economic Knowledge, Journal of Economic History, December 1992, 52(4), 977-978.

1992

N. De Marchi (ed.), “The Popperian Legacy in Economics: Papers Presented at a Symposium in Amsterdam”, December 1985, Philosophy of the Social Sciences, December 1990, 19(4), 527-531.

1990

P. Deane, The State and the Economic System: An Introduction to the History of Political Economy, Journal of Economic History, March 1990, 50(1), 240-241.

1990

G.C. Harcourt, Controversies in Political Economy, Eastern Economic Journal, January - March 1988, 14(1), 114-115.

1988

J.A. McGaw, Most Wonderful Machine: Mechanization and Social Change in Berkshire Paper Making, 1801 - 1885, Journal of Economic History, December 1987, 47(4),1044-1046.

1987

C.E. Twining, Phil Weyerhaeuser: Lumberman, Journal of Economic History, Dec. 1986, 46(4), 1098-9.

1986

D.L. Boese, Papermakers: The Blandin Paper Company and Grand Rapids, Minnesota, Journal of Forest History, January 1986, 30(1), 44-45.

1986

J. Pen, Among Economists: Reflections of a Neo-classical Post Keynesian, Journal of Economic Literature, September 1986, 24(3), 1218-1219.

1986

J. Elster, Explaining Technical Change, Journal of Economic Issues, March 1985, 19(1), 263-265.

1985

J.J. Klant, The Rules of the Game: The Logical Structure of Economic Theories, Journal of Economic Literature, December 1985, 23(4), 1788-1789.

1985

Books

Publication
Year

Macroeconomics for Life: Smart Choices for All?, updated 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2019 [2015, 2010]).

2019

Macroeconomics FlexText, 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Canada, 2018).

2018

Microeconomics FlexText, 1st edition (Toronto, Pearson Canada, 2018).

2018

Microeconomics for Life: Smart Choices for You, 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2009]).

2015

Study Guide, 8th edition (with H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 8th edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2012 [2009, 2006, 2003, 2000, 1997, 1994, 1991]).

2009

Capital Theory, Vols I-III, (co-edited with C. Bliss and G.C. Harcourt), in the series Critical Ideas in Economics (edited by K.D. Hoover and M. Blaug) (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

Economics Study Guide: European Edition (with D. Fry, H. King and M. Powell) to accompany Parkin, Powell and Matthews, Economics European Edition, 6th edition (Harlow, England: Addison-Wesley, 2005).

2005

Guide de l’étudiant (with Pierre Chapleau and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Microéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [1999, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Microeconomics].

2005

Guide de l’étudiant (with D. Sanga and H. King) to accompany Parkin and Bade Introduction à la Macroéconomie Moderne (Saint-Laurent, Quebec: Éditions Du Renouveau Pédagogique), 2005 [2000, 1993] [French translation of Canadian Study Guide – Macroeconomics].

2005

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 3rd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Parkin and Bade Economics, 3rd edition (Don Mills, Ontario: Addison-Wesley, 1997).

1997

Macroeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Macroeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997 [1996]).

1997

Microeconomics Study Guide, 4th edition (with H. King and M. Rush) to accompany Parkin Microeconomics, 4th edition (Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1997 [1995]).

1997

Money, Financial Institutions and Macroeconomic Policy, (co-edited with H. Hagemann and J. Smithin) (Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997).

1997

Professional Journal Articles

Publication
Year

"A Pareto-Improving Way to Teach Principles of Economics: Evidence from the University of Toronto" (with D. Benjamin and G. Hamilton), AEA Papers and Proceedings, 110 (May): 299-303

2020

“Scalable, Scaffolded Writing Assignments with Online Peer Review in a Large Introductory Economics Course” (with A. Williams), Journal of Economic Education, 50(4), 371-387.

2019

“Veblen Contra Clark and Fisher: Veblen-Robinson-Harcourt Lineages in Capital Controversies and Beyond,” Cambridge Journal of Economics, November 2014, 38(6), 1493-1515.

2014

“Capital Controversy from Böhm-Bawerk to Bliss: Badly Posed or Very Deep Questions? or What ‘We’ Can Learn from Capital Controversy Even If You Don’t Care Who Won,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2010, 32(1), 1-21 (lead article).

2010

"The Mythology of Capital or of Static Equilibrium?: The Böhm-Bawerk/Clark Controversy,” Journal of the History of Economic Thought, June 2008, 30(2), 151-71 (lead article).

2008

“The Kaldor/Knight Controversy: Is Capital A Distinct and Quantifiable Factor of Production?” European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, March 2006, 13(1), 141-161.

2006

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251. Reprinted in C. Bliss, A. Cohen and G.C. Harcourt (eds.) Capital Theory: Vol. 3, (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, 2005).

2005

“Cambridge Capital Controversies – Comments and Response” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Fall 2003, 17(4), 227-233.

2003

“The Hayek/Knight Capital Controversy: The Irrelevance of Roundaboutness, or Purging Processes in Time?” History of Political Economy, Fall 2003, 35(3), 469-490.

2003

“Whatever Happened to the Cambridge Capital Controversies?” (with G.C. Harcourt), Journal of Economic Perspectives, Winter 2003, 17(1), 199-214.

2003

“Using Writing Across the Curriculum in Economics: Is Taking the Plunge Worth It?” (with J. Spencer), Journal of Economic Education, Summer 1993, 24(3), 219-230.

1993

"What Was Abandoned Following the Cambridge Capital Controversies?: Samuelson, Substance, Scarcity and Value," History of Political Economy, Annual Supplement 1993, 25(5), 202-219.

1993

“Seeing the Light Despite the Heat: Post-Mirowski History of Economic Thought," Philosophy of the Social Sciences, March 1992, 22(1), 83-96.

1992

"Prices, Capital and the One-Commodity Model in Neoclassical and Classical Theories,” History of Political Economy, Summer 1989, 21(2), 231-251.

1989

"Factor Substitution and Induced Innovation in North American Kraft Pulping: 1914-1940,” Explorations in Economic History, April 1987, 24(2), 197-217.

1987

"Issues in the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1985, 7(4), 612-615.

1985

“Technological Change as Historical Process: The Case of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry, 1915 - 1940," Journal of Economic History, September 1984, 44(3), 775-799.

1984

“The Methodological Resolution of the Cambridge Controversies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Summer 1984, 6(4), 614-629.

1984

"Classical and Neoclassical Theories of General Equilibrium" (with J. Cohen), Australian Economic Papers , 22(40), June 1983, pp. 180-200.

1983

"The Laws of Returns Under Competitive Conditions: Progress in Microeconomics Since Sraffa (1926)?" Eastern Economic Journal, July-September 1983, 9(3), 213-220. Reprinted in M. Blaug (ed.), Pioneers in Economics: Vol. 44 Piero Sraffa (Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1992).

1983

Other

Publication
Year

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 2nd edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for All?, 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2010]).

2015

Instructor’s Manual (with PowerPoint Lecture Slides), 1st edition (with S. Cohen) to accompany Economics for Life: Smart Choices for You , 2nd edition (Toronto, Pearson Education Canada, 2015 [2009]).

2015


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall 2020 AP/ECON1000 3.0 A Introduction to Microeconomics LECT


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Winter 2021 AP/ECON1010 3.0 H Introduction to Macroeconomics BLEN