dalaho


Sirvan Karimi

Photo of Sirvan Karimi

School of Public Policy and Administration

Assistant Professor

Office: 133 MCLaughlin College
Phone: 416-736-2100 Ext: 22782
Email: dalaho@yorku.ca

Media Requests Welcome
Accepting New Graduate Students


Dr. Sirvan Karimi has written his doctoral dissertation on Comparative social policy in Canada and Australia. His PhD dissertation is titled; Social Classes, National Settings, and the Welfare State: The Public Pension Systems in Canada and Australia. His research focuses on Canadian politics, public policy, public administration, and public law . In addition to publishing several scholarly articles, he is the sole author of two scholarly books; Beyond the Welfare State: Postwar Social Settlement and Public Pension Policy in Canada and Australia. Toronto: University of Toronto press, 2017 and The Tragedy of Social Democracy. Winnipeg: Frenwood Publishing, 2015.

His research interests focus on Comparative social policy, Social Democracy, and Democratic Administration. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of his academic background, he has published numerous articles on various areas related to Canadian politics, Comparative Politics, and international politics with a specific focus on the democratization in the Middle East.
Dr. Karimi has been teaching courses at both graduate and undergraduate levels since 2007. In addition to teaching at York University, he has also taught courses at Brock and Ryerson Universities. He has been teaching courses along all three streams (Public Policy, Public Administration and Public Law) within the School of Public Policy and Administration curriculum. He has also supervised MRPs for several MA students in the Master of Public Policy, Administration and Law (MPPAL) program.
Dr. Karimi has been recognized for his teaching efforts with a variety of teaching nominations and awards, including being nominated for the President's University-Wide Teaching Award for 2013-2014 and receiving the Dean's Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching in the Faculty of Liberal Arts &Professional Studies for 2015-2016.

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Degrees

Ph.D , York University
MA , York University
B.A. Honours , University of Winnipeg

Research Interests

Politics and Government , Public Administration, Public Law , Social policy
Books

Publication
Year

This book analyses the rise and decline of social democracy

2015

Monographs

Publication
Year

This books deals with comparative study of pension policy in Canada and Australia

2017

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

It discusses how Afghanistan fiasco can be interpreted as an empirical testimony to the failure of implanting democratic institutions in non-liberal societies.

2021

The tension emanated from deeply polarized socio-cultural values has found its way into the Canadian university campuses. In their endeavour to strike a balance between promoting diversity, inclusion and respecting free speech, the Canadian higher educational institutions have encountered formidable challenges. Central to the contention revolving around the free speech debate is an assertion that institutional pressures for consolidating a culture of political correctness is believed to have the potential to curtail and stifle freedom of expression which has in turn triggered governmental intervention in certain Canadian provinces. The lack of a proper balance between the quest for promoting inclusion, diversity and free speech can in the long run undermine the socially vital mission of universities, and hence corroding the public trust in the higher educational institutions. Obviously, there is no single solution that can function as panacea to surmount these pressing demands faced by the Canadian universities. However, it will be argued that the extension of constitutionally protected freedom of expression to the Canadian universities is not only geared to address the shortcomings of academic freedom, but it is also conducive to harmonizing the pursuit of promoting diversity and inclusion with upholding free speech principles.

2021

As an organic intellectual of the emerging propertied class in 17th century England, John Locke has made an enduring contribution to the prevailing ideas shaping the socio-political order in Western societies and beyond. Through invoking the law of nature and natural rights which were nothing more than what he had abstracted from the socio-economic conditions of the seventeenth century and had projected back into the state of nature, Locke assiduously embarked on justifying the separation of civil society from the state, naturalizing class inequalities, identifying the preservation of property as the fundamental function of the state, and rationalizing the subordination of propertyless classes to the emerging liberal democratic political order geared to preserve the interests of economically hegemonic classes.

2021

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: Its Charms and Limits

2021

Public Administration and Democracy: The Virtue and Limit of Participatory Democracy as a Democratic Innovation. Technium Social Sciences Journal, vol.15, no 1,pp.491-506

2021

The appeals, challenges , and the Limits of Digital Education in the Post COVID Era

2021

The Appeals and Limits of Digital Education in the Post-COVID Era

2021

Politicization of responses to COVID-19 pandemic

2020

Killing of Soleimani Presents Opportunities, Not Just Challenges.

2020

Discusses strikes in the Canadian Education Sector

2020

Discusses the reasons behind European appeasement policy toward the Islamic Regime of Iran

2020

Canada Could Benefit from Trump Challenges

2019

The Left and anti-imperialism

2019

Highlights the flaws in Canadian Electoral System

2019

Discusses the Interplay of Neo-liberal Project and Social Capital

2011

Liberal Democracy, Citizenship, Class: Unresolved Contradictions of Capitalist Social Relations

2009

Analyses the interplay of economic restructuring, class and the Canadian state

2002

Approach to Teaching


My approach to teaching at the university level is based on a pedagogical approach that promotes the development of critical skills in line with the course curriculum designed to meet the learning goals of students. This student-centred teaching approach puts heavy emphasis on employing effective learning strategies to engage students in their learning. In order to enhance skills development of students, I have attempted to integrate a critical perspective into course materials and assignments. My approach has been greatly structured by my teaching experience in a variety of Public Policy, Public Administration and Public Law courses over the past several years. My teaching experience includes teaching a variety of class sizes ranging from 20 to 200 students. In my teaching, I employ diverse teaching methods such as conventional lectures, group exercises, seminars, reflective learning, simulation and experiential education.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/PPAS3190 6.0 A Public Administration LECT
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 A Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 B Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/PPAS3190 6.0 A Public Administration LECT
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 A Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 B Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR


Dr. Sirvan Karimi has written his doctoral dissertation on Comparative social policy in Canada and Australia. His PhD dissertation is titled; Social Classes, National Settings, and the Welfare State: The Public Pension Systems in Canada and Australia. His research focuses on Canadian politics, public policy, public administration, and public law . In addition to publishing several scholarly articles, he is the sole author of two scholarly books; Beyond the Welfare State: Postwar Social Settlement and Public Pension Policy in Canada and Australia. Toronto: University of Toronto press, 2017 and The Tragedy of Social Democracy. Winnipeg: Frenwood Publishing, 2015.

His research interests focus on Comparative social policy, Social Democracy, and Democratic Administration. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of his academic background, he has published numerous articles on various areas related to Canadian politics, Comparative Politics, and international politics with a specific focus on the democratization in the Middle East.
Dr. Karimi has been teaching courses at both graduate and undergraduate levels since 2007. In addition to teaching at York University, he has also taught courses at Brock and Ryerson Universities. He has been teaching courses along all three streams (Public Policy, Public Administration and Public Law) within the School of Public Policy and Administration curriculum. He has also supervised MRPs for several MA students in the Master of Public Policy, Administration and Law (MPPAL) program.
Dr. Karimi has been recognized for his teaching efforts with a variety of teaching nominations and awards, including being nominated for the President's University-Wide Teaching Award for 2013-2014 and receiving the Dean's Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching in the Faculty of Liberal Arts &Professional Studies for 2015-2016.

Degrees

Ph.D , York University
MA , York University
B.A. Honours , University of Winnipeg

Research Interests

Politics and Government , Public Administration, Public Law , Social policy

All Publications


Books

Publication
Year

This book analyses the rise and decline of social democracy

2015

Monographs

Publication
Year

This books deals with comparative study of pension policy in Canada and Australia

2017

Journal Articles

Publication
Year

It discusses how Afghanistan fiasco can be interpreted as an empirical testimony to the failure of implanting democratic institutions in non-liberal societies.

2021

The tension emanated from deeply polarized socio-cultural values has found its way into the Canadian university campuses. In their endeavour to strike a balance between promoting diversity, inclusion and respecting free speech, the Canadian higher educational institutions have encountered formidable challenges. Central to the contention revolving around the free speech debate is an assertion that institutional pressures for consolidating a culture of political correctness is believed to have the potential to curtail and stifle freedom of expression which has in turn triggered governmental intervention in certain Canadian provinces. The lack of a proper balance between the quest for promoting inclusion, diversity and free speech can in the long run undermine the socially vital mission of universities, and hence corroding the public trust in the higher educational institutions. Obviously, there is no single solution that can function as panacea to surmount these pressing demands faced by the Canadian universities. However, it will be argued that the extension of constitutionally protected freedom of expression to the Canadian universities is not only geared to address the shortcomings of academic freedom, but it is also conducive to harmonizing the pursuit of promoting diversity and inclusion with upholding free speech principles.

2021

As an organic intellectual of the emerging propertied class in 17th century England, John Locke has made an enduring contribution to the prevailing ideas shaping the socio-political order in Western societies and beyond. Through invoking the law of nature and natural rights which were nothing more than what he had abstracted from the socio-economic conditions of the seventeenth century and had projected back into the state of nature, Locke assiduously embarked on justifying the separation of civil society from the state, naturalizing class inequalities, identifying the preservation of property as the fundamental function of the state, and rationalizing the subordination of propertyless classes to the emerging liberal democratic political order geared to preserve the interests of economically hegemonic classes.

2021

The Paradox of Universal Basic Income: Its Charms and Limits

2021

Public Administration and Democracy: The Virtue and Limit of Participatory Democracy as a Democratic Innovation. Technium Social Sciences Journal, vol.15, no 1,pp.491-506

2021

The appeals, challenges , and the Limits of Digital Education in the Post COVID Era

2021

The Appeals and Limits of Digital Education in the Post-COVID Era

2021

Politicization of responses to COVID-19 pandemic

2020

Killing of Soleimani Presents Opportunities, Not Just Challenges.

2020

Discusses strikes in the Canadian Education Sector

2020

Discusses the reasons behind European appeasement policy toward the Islamic Regime of Iran

2020

Canada Could Benefit from Trump Challenges

2019

The Left and anti-imperialism

2019

Highlights the flaws in Canadian Electoral System

2019

Discusses the Interplay of Neo-liberal Project and Social Capital

2011

Liberal Democracy, Citizenship, Class: Unresolved Contradictions of Capitalist Social Relations

2009

Analyses the interplay of economic restructuring, class and the Canadian state

2002

Approach to Teaching


My approach to teaching at the university level is based on a pedagogical approach that promotes the development of critical skills in line with the course curriculum designed to meet the learning goals of students. This student-centred teaching approach puts heavy emphasis on employing effective learning strategies to engage students in their learning. In order to enhance skills development of students, I have attempted to integrate a critical perspective into course materials and assignments. My approach has been greatly structured by my teaching experience in a variety of Public Policy, Public Administration and Public Law courses over the past several years. My teaching experience includes teaching a variety of class sizes ranging from 20 to 200 students. In my teaching, I employ diverse teaching methods such as conventional lectures, group exercises, seminars, reflective learning, simulation and experiential education.


Current Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/PPAS3190 6.0 A Public Administration LECT
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 A Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 B Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR


Upcoming Courses

Term Course Number Section Title Type
Fall/Winter 2021 AP/PPAS3190 6.0 A Public Administration LECT
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 A Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR
Fall/Winter 2021 GS/PPAL6100 3.0 B Canadian Constitutional Law SEMR